Need help with t-post and wire fence design for run

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Trish1974, Jul 23, 2016.

  1. Trish1974

    Trish1974 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all! I am getting ready to build a chicken run, 25'x12', and I am wanting to use 7' steel t-posts and welded wire fencing. My quandary is how can I reinforce the the netting I want to cover the run with from sagging down?
     
  2. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Drive a few posts down the center of the run, stretch a heavy wire to the top of this run of posts. You may want to run some wire from this center posts to the sides of the run. Drape the netting over the wires and attach at the run fence. Make sense?

    Ed
     
  3. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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  4. Trish1974

    Trish1974 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I like that idea, Ed! Thank you! Junebuggena, that is a good idea also, but I do not have any wooden posts nor am I up for any post hole digging. Trying to keep everything in steel t-posts since that is what I have laying around. Thank you both!
     
  5. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You're welcome, Trish1974. I take it that you're figuring on a covered run that you cannot stand upright in, correct? Or will the posts have six feet of their length above ground? Just curious. :)

    Ed
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Where are you located...is snow load an issue??
     
  7. Trish1974

    Trish1974 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am wanting a run I can walk-in, so I planned on driving the posts a foot deep. Yes, I do get snow, but planned on using deer fence netting on the top to prevent hawks and eagles from dive bombing my kids. There is an immature bald eagle around who took my rooster and one hen last month putting an end to their free-ranging days. :(
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Most snow of any amount will very likely take deer netting down.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    With T-posts as corner posts, you will almost certainly get some sagging from the weight of the fencing, tension in the fencing, and wind, let alone any ice or snow that may build up on the netting on top. If you don’t use wooden corner posts and really set them in solidly, I suggest you use guywires to brace them to keep them from sagging. By guywire, I’m talking about a wire that goes from the top of the fence post to an anchor in the ground in line with the fence. The guywires are a pain to mow and weed-eat around but I just don’t see how it is gong to fail to sag, especially if you only drive them in a foot or less. A wet snow or ice will build up on that netting.

    12’ is a long span for netting or wire. I agree with driving a few posts in the middle of the run and stretching a wire along the top, but that probably will still not be enough to get the netting up out of your way. I’d consider driving your 7’ posts in the middle, then wire another t-post to the one you drove, overlapping them about 3’. Or you can use pipe clamps instead of wire if you wish. By overlapping them 3’ you will get a 4’ extension, plenty of height for you to walk under.
     
  10. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ridgerunnerr is right about the drooping fence. For walking beneath it you will definitely want some height on it. The posts that you are talking about using...are they only 6' long from end-to-end?...or longer?

    An option for the corner posts is to brace them from the inside. A short post/peg put in the ground, an inclinded pole/post braced against that short post and pressed against the corner post from inside to counter the weight of the fence/netting. Same thing could be done along the fence line in a spot or two...would keep a guywire out of the way of lawnmowers, etc.,.

    Ed
     

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