Neighborhood dogs keep killing chickens

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by ConnerM, Mar 28, 2016.

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  1. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    I fully agree with this, a friend (or even a good neighbor) would not allow his dog to run free and harm my animals on my property, the fact that they feel or believe they are entitled to let their dog run free on my property, feel they are entitled and allowed to harm my animals on my property all in clear violations of the law without consequences sort of implies they are not my friends to start with...
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2016
  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    If dogs can get them so can something else. Dogs can be big hitters although in many / most situations wildlife is a more consistent, especially in more rural locations. Same measures for controlling losses to both apply.
     
  3. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    You are correct, and I deal with those predators the same way as I would a dog, by giving them lead poisoning to the head...

    Truth is in many (likley most) cases wild predators fear humans, hunt primarily at night, and they don't kill just for fun... There are of course exceptions, the same can't be said for domestic dogs who almost always violate the previous predatory actions listed... This is why a lot of people let their chicken range in relatively insecure areas during the day as wild predator attacks are minimal in many areas during the day... Sure if you choose to secure your ranging area that is an option but I will never buy into barricading my property against my neighbors dog because they allow it to run at large and harm my animals in clear violation of the law...
     
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  4. pipAchick

    pipAchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Another point,,,,make sure IF your going to shoot something (dog,coyote,racoon) that's attacking your chickens you have practiced,,,,actual lead bullets (verses a bb or pellet, heck even a paint ball gun can give a serious warning at close range) can penetrate thin walls or be WAY bad if you miss your intended target. Not everyone has 200 acres to target practice on or gain such self assurance when it comes to handeling fire arms. Some folks take for granted their options aren't as practical for others.
    In a zombie apocalypse all you gun know how's shoot whatever's moving but if there's a family residing 50feet over just be responsible please!
     
  5. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    There are laws about shooting firearms in a residential area. If I remember correctly, the OP does live in town. If so, shooting the dog in the act of attacking chickens is not an option. They would have to catch the dog, take it somewhere that would be safe, then shoot it. In this case, I would say securing the coop/run area with electric fence would be the best solution. Not that I'm opposed to shooting a dog that's attacking my flock, but I live in the country and have the legal right to do so. No neighbors within 1/2 mile.

    As far as small children and electric fences, that's not too hard to figure out. Kids go out to play, unplug the fence. Not that hard. You just need to remember to plug it back in when they come in. My kids grew up with electric fences to keep the horses in. As far as I know, none of them ever got knocked to the ground by one. They did, however, learn not to go near them...
     
  6. seanengler

    seanengler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I haven't read EVERY post on here but I definitely don't think I or anyone else was implying that it's their fault due to poor protection, but you owe yourself and the chickens a certain level of protection I think we would all agree on that. At our last house, it was a tract house with cinder block walls. No strays getting in that yard, maybe some hawk potential. Didn't use an electric net there. At our house now, we live in a rural area where if anyone does have a fence, its barbed wire or just field fence, so yeah, I would accept some responsibility if I was losing chickens on my property to any predator. I think common sense would require some level of protection. If it's not the stray, it'll be a fox or coyote, but with the stray, you have someone else to blame, that's the only difference I see. All that being said, don't get me wrong, the dog is the 100% the dog owners responsibility. You mentioned your neighbor down the road, I hear ya. We have a neighbor who insists on their dog being loose in the front yard. Makes simple tasks like walking the half mile to the mailbox a dangerous chore without pepper spray or a club, gotta love those neighbors!!
     
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  7. seanengler

    seanengler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can't even begin to tell you how many bullets go astray even out where everyone lives on 200 acres. Great point!
     
  8. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's pretty hard for a bullet to go astray and do damage if you know what your shooting at and aren't shooting up into the air, when bullets strike the ground or trees they aren't going to go far after that however your are correct one should always practice gun safety and not shoot into a perspectively bad situation.


    Yes it was implied that shooting a dog when your chickens aren't safely contained could get you in trouble, my point is it's legal to let your animals range your property fences or not, a farmer does not have a legal responsibility to prove they went through X amount of steps to protect their stock before shooting a dog. Letting a dog astray is illegal, keeping chickens loose in your field is not, your livestock has every right to be there, the offending predator does not and barring a situation where your aren't allowed to shoot in town or aren't allowed to have chickens in town you aren't going to get in trouble for protecting your livestock especially when the animal control law states as much.
     
  9. seanengler

    seanengler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Again, I don't disagree with you. I just skimmed over a few posts like I said. I still stand by what I said, I would still avoid getting more chickens until the predator protection issue is fixed. If the dog can get in, while not the chicken owners fault, is still an issue for many other predators that's all I'm trying to say. And again, I agree, you're right, it's hard for a bullet to go astray when common sense gun safety is exercised. Often times it is not, judging by the bullet holes in some of the homes' siding in our area, I would say it's pretty easy for shots to go wild depending who's behind the gun.
     
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  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Shooting is not time wise. I have shot many wild predators and trapped a good number as well. Keeping closed flocks long term has taught me repelling ground predators is first line of defense. Shooting and trapping is reserved for the relatively rare events where first line fails.


    Bluecoondog and Chickencanoe, when it comes to the gungho approach with a firearm to put down a dog that left my property I can call up personal experience. Recently some neighbors cheered me in my efforts. Another party related to dog owner had a gun trained on me through front window while her spouse talked to me even though my unarmed firearm was not held in a minacing manner and I was cool headed. At that point in time I was not aware of the gun trained on me. Think of possibilities if I were hot headed. I was already a a one man lench mob even though acting within the law. Some parties were concerned for their dogs safety even though I new exactly what dog I was after. We must back away from the wild west approach as it gets dicey even for the good guys when everyone exercises their 2nd amendment rights as a way to reinforce their attitude..
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2016
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