Nest destroyed, eggs in incubator, how long to hatch?

Victoria-nola

Songster
8 Years
Oct 10, 2011
506
266
202
Southwest Mississippi
Without going into the whole long saga, my immediate problem is that my guineas were setting on a nest and I happened to find it so we were monitoring them. The pair were killed at night a few days later, and that same day I realized it and brought the eggs in and put them in my incubator, despite the fact they were cold. They all have developed as I can see by candling. My question is, how do I know how long to expect them to need incubation on the egg turner, and when should I remove the turner for the "last 3 days" as per recommended practice? Should I give up on that idea and just watch for the first pip and then remove the turner?

Today 5/13 is the 13th day they've been in the incubator. I don't know for sure how many days before that the hen was setting on the nest. I discovered the nest 5-7 days prior to the nest destruction, so it's at least that long, or 18-20 days total as of now. (Guineas typically set for ~28 days.)

All the eggs have veins and apparent development, many of the eggs have distinct movement in them that respond to my speaking to the egg and handling during candling. Thoughts or suggestions? Thank you. (I also asked this question on the hatching forum.)
 

R2elk

*
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
33,233
161,538
1,641
Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
My Coop
Without going into the whole long saga, my immediate problem is that my guineas were setting on a nest and I happened to find it so we were monitoring them. The pair were killed at night a few days later, and that same day I realized it and brought the eggs in and put them in my incubator, despite the fact they were cold. They all have developed as I can see by candling. My question is, how do I know how long to expect them to need incubation on the egg turner, and when should I remove the turner for the "last 3 days" as per recommended practice? Should I give up on that idea and just watch for the first pip and then remove the turner?

Today 5/13 is the 13th day they've been in the incubator. I don't know for sure how many days before that the hen was setting on the nest. I discovered the nest 5-7 days prior to the nest destruction, so it's at least that long, or 18-20 days total as of now. (Guineas typically set for ~28 days.)

All the eggs have veins and apparent development, many of the eggs have distinct movement in them that respond to my speaking to the egg and handling during candling. Thoughts or suggestions? Thank you. (I also asked this question on the hatching forum.)
If you are good at candling, you can tell when the keets have internally pipped. Once they have internally pipped, they will hatch within a day or two.

I have had keets hatch in the incubator while the turner was on and not in a lockdown situation. Once I find a hatched keet, I shut the turner off and go to lockdown.

Don't be surprised if all of the eggs are not at the same stage of development.

Good luck.
 

Victoria-nola

Songster
8 Years
Oct 10, 2011
506
266
202
Southwest Mississippi
If you are good at candling, you can tell when the keets have internally pipped. Once they have internally pipped, they will hatch within a day or two.

I have had keets hatch in the incubator while the turner was on and not in a lockdown situation. Once I find a hatched keet, I shut the turner off and go to lockdown.

Don't be surprised if all of the eggs are not at the same stage of development.

Good luck.

Thanks so much for your help. Yes, I do know what it looks like when they are internally pipped but I don't have a lot of confidence in my accuracy. Also, I am already pretty certain they are at different stages. So, say I decide that hatch is imminent on a particular egg-- and remove the turner. Should I keep turning the other eggs if they are behind? I guess how long I should continue to give the eggs a chance will be pretty obvious whether there is any continued movement inside or not. But I really need to know if I should be turning the less-developed eggs or not.
 

Granny Hatchet

Tastes like chicken
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Sep 26, 2013
145,285
230,665
2,037
madison Indiana
someone please correct me if I am wrong but the first 2 weeks is important in turning so the chick dont stick. after that it becomes less important. When the first one hatches it will be turning the other eggs by rawling on them. I dont think you have much worry and I would turn it off/ take it out after the first internal pip.
 

Granny Hatchet

Tastes like chicken
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Sep 26, 2013
145,285
230,665
2,037
madison Indiana
:D this one hatched in my hand.
032.jpg
 

R2elk

*
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
33,233
161,538
1,641
Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
My Coop
someone please correct me if I am wrong but the first 2 weeks is important in turning so the chick dont stick. after that it becomes less important. When the first one hatches it will be turning the other eggs by rawling on them. I dont think you have much worry and I would turn it off/ take it out after the first internal pip.
You are correct. There is very little harm in guinea eggs not being turned after 3 weeks. But depending on the type of turner, eggs can also hatch while being turned. The problem is that some types of turners can be hazardous to newly hatched keets.
 

Victoria-nola

Songster
8 Years
Oct 10, 2011
506
266
202
Southwest Mississippi
:D this one hatched in my hand. View attachment 1041775
sweet. My first hatch with the guineas I currently have, I did the "dry incubation" method thinking I was doing the right thing. Of 26 live hatches, I had to help 18 of them because they were glued in. Some of them wound up opening in my hand because they were so vigorous once I broke out the membrane. That was a wonderful feeling, so your picture called that up. My current guinea eggs, I'm maintaining 50-55% humidity per the instructions that came with those first eggs last spring.
 

Victoria-nola

Songster
8 Years
Oct 10, 2011
506
266
202
Southwest Mississippi
You are correct. There is very little harm in guinea eggs not being turned after 3 weeks. But depending on the type of turner, eggs can also hatch while being turned. The problem is that some types of turners can be hazardous to newly hatched keets.
I have a Hova-Bator 1583 with the egg turner (link below). I had heard that turners can injure hatchlings so I've been frantic to avoid that. Do you know anything about that turner? Thanks.
http://incubatorwarehouse.com/hova-bator-egg-turner-chicken.html
 

R2elk

*
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
33,233
161,538
1,641
Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
My Coop
I have a Hova-Bator 1583 with the egg turner (link below). I had heard that turners can injure hatchlings so I've been frantic to avoid that. Do you know anything about that turner? Thanks.
http://incubatorwarehouse.com/hova-bator-egg-turner-chicken.html
Sorry, other than knowing that incubator has a good reputation, I don't really know anything about it. I use an old GQF 1202 cabinet incubator that has been altered. The keets have been hatching since this morning and there are at least 17 out so far.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom