New Duckling Owner i have Question's

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Feathered Wings, Mar 19, 2009.

  1. Feathered Wings

    Feathered Wings Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 9, 2008
    Georgia
    We bought our first little ducks yesterday and i have a few questions

    1. When can i let them have grass clippings?
    2. What kind of things can i feed them and what should i avoid? (I'm feeding them nonmedicated starter)
    3. How long do they need heat?
    4. how old do they have to be before i can let them have a shallow pan to swim in?
    5. I'm useing a chick water and they really make a mess is there any other water's i can use.
    6. What type of feeder can i use right now i'm useing a shallow pan ?
    7. How fast do they grow?

    8. Okay and this one is from my son when can he take them out in the grass for walks?
     
  2. Duck Keeper

    Duck Keeper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 18, 2009
    Out in the Boonies
    Remember that I'm new to this too okay?


    I'd say that if you supplied chick grit, you can give them grass.

    Most anything that doesn't contain too much water (like iceberg lettuce), but don't feed them citrus, moldy things, or bread (yes, bread).

    Every day (?) you can decrease the temperature by maybe one degree, but just try to go by how they act. If they huddle together under the light, put it lower, if they crowd around the edges trying to stay cool, move it higher ect.

    You shouldn't -ever- allow them to have free access to water; they'll get too wet and cold on their own and might drown. On the other hand, you can supervise some baths if you'd like, and let them have rests every now and then, but make sure to dry them off good after and let them warm up.
    (Keep their pen/housing dry though!)

    You can put some marbles or stones too big for them to choke on in there, and they won't be able to splash it around as much.

    I used half-gallon milk jugs, with tiny holes cut out of the sides for my feeders and waterers. You can just toss them when they're nasty, or you can clean them up and cut the holes bigger later on. This will require some trial and error, so make the holes small at first; you can always cut them larger after you try it out.

    They grow in leaps and bounds! Holy cow, one day you'll wake up, and POOF! there'll be some feathers there. [​IMG]

    If you take care not to let them get too chilled, you can start taking them out when they're getting feathers through if the weather's nice. Also, be wary of hawks and cats and dogs and other children and leaving them alone and.... Be careful. [​IMG]


    Hope this helps. I'm only a novice!
     
  3. Duck Keeper

    Duck Keeper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Make sure to inspect the area for any foreign objects like lead shot or whatever... They'll pick up shiny things and be poisoned or choke.

    And don't let them in a mud puddle! [​IMG] Your lawn will have millions of little doodling holes where they were searching for bugs.

    Unless you like to watch them go at it. [​IMG]

    Like me.
     
  4. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    Colorado
    You shouldn't -ever- allow them to have free access to water; they'll get too wet and cold on their own and might drown

    I have a rabbit water bottle they have access to at all times.​
     
  5. satay

    satay oz-e-chick

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    Esk Qld Australia
    I have had ducks for years now Khaki campbells and Muscoveys. My ducks eat everything including bread and lettuce(some don't agree with feeding this to them but it has never hurt my ducks). I let them swim from day one, never alone though always watched. I live in Australia so we have extreemly hot summers and rather cool winters. It doesn't snow here.
    Like others have said they grow really fast. They love bugs and grass to munch on as well. I am not sure how long you would need to keep them under a heat lamp for never had to do it here as it is soo hot in summer which is when they sit and hatch here.
     
  6. satay

    satay oz-e-chick

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    For feeders I use a long piece of gutter (like the stuff on houses) for feeders and they have a kids clam shell pool for outside swimming etc.
     
  7. Duck Keeper

    Duck Keeper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You shouldn't -ever- allow them to have free access to water; they'll get too wet and cold on their own and might drown

    I have a rabbit water bottle they have access to at all times.

    I'm talking swimming water, but I would think a rabbit bottle is insufficient because they need to dip their bills into the water to clear their nostrils of excess food build-up.​
     
  8. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    They get small containers of water deep enough for bill-dipping along with their veggie several times a day. Plus swimming time.
     
  9. Feathered Wings

    Feathered Wings Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 9, 2008
    Georgia
    Thanks a bunch for the info.

    We have never had little ducks and when they had them at the feed store well we couldn't resist. [​IMG]
    We got 3 mallards (my son's) and 7 Cayuga , 3 Khaki Campbell's (mine)
    I like the milk jug idea these just seem to go at the water all day.
    Chick grit i didn't know they needed grit i will have to get some.
    My son can't wait to get them out in the grass i will make sure theres no dangerous things for them to eat.
    So i can do a little swimmy in a shallow pan and dry them off "Cool" [​IMG]

    Thanks so much [​IMG]
     
  10. Duck Keeper

    Duck Keeper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 18, 2009
    Out in the Boonies
    Use chick grit it if they have access to vegetable matter.

    Make sure to either pinion, or clip your mallard's feathers later if flying off would be an issue. Mallards tend to be (mine anyway) flighty and nervous, and they're so small they can whisk away in a second i they aren't in their pen. [​IMG]

    I love my Khaki and Cayugas though... Cayugas are fat and nice, and the Khaki is very quiet, albeit nervous. She lays very consistantly. [​IMG]
     

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