New gander behavior

Dec 30, 2020
128
378
116
Pacific Northwest
Hello all!

It's a pleasure to finally be on BYC, this is my first post. I have lurked and read forums for over a year now since I started planning for my first flock and I decided I would make an account cause I have a question.

I have a Embden gander, Hugo. He has been a widower twice, once being while he has been in my possession. Hugo lost is first wife to a car accident and he was very lonely and everybody found him to be a nuisance. I became very infactuated with Hugo's beauty and I vowed to home him once I raised my laying hens up and had my forever coop established. His second wife who I purchased for him, Lola, was brutally attacked in broad daylight one day while I was away at work. Her head and throat injuries were severe and there wasn't much I could do to save her. I felt so terrible as this was my ganders first goose wife (his rebound was a female pot belly after his first wife) in over a year and he was so enamored with Lola. He mourned for a couple weeks and I found a beautiful 4 month old Pilgrim. It took a few days for them to be acquainted but they are very much inseparable now. They have been together for about 2 months now.

Recently, Hugo makes this high pitched trumpet call beginning in the early hours of the morning usually around 6am. Sometimes he toots his horn at 4-5am, rarely. And it continues intermediately throughout the day.

What does this call mean? He never made this particular call before. Sometimes with his second wife, Lola. But with the Pilgrim it's very often. He was always a quiet bird usually, especially during dark hours. Now he's very vocal! Any goose experts have any input?

For perspective, I also have a rescued "wild" Canada goose, Toque. I found him as a gosling in the spring abandoned and exhausted on the river I live on. Toque's parents never came back into the night. I couldn't go to bed knowing I could have saved this new little fluff to die. Toque has since become an integral part of our family. Hugo and toque were pals until I found Lola. Is this Hugo's dominance call to my canada goose perhaps?

Thanks in advance! Happy to be here:frow
 

Goosebaby

Crowing
Nov 10, 2019
1,920
2,425
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Northern California
Could you post a video of his calls? Also what breed is he?

From what I’ve observed with my geese the loud honks are contact calls or sort of an “I’m here and all’s well.” It could be that he’s making sure the Canada goose is also alright, maybe he sees it as part of his flock, or maybe he’s also bonded more with you and is calling out to you for the same reason? Or he could be more obsessive with making sure his mate is safe at his side after what he’s been through?
 

Callender Girl

Crossing the Road
Sep 18, 2018
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18,038
766
North Central Iowa
Both of my geese are girls, but I know Golly often calls to Gussie if they can't see each other, so maybe -- just maybe -- it is, as Goosebaby suggested -- a checking in call to make sure everybody is okay?

Hope more folks weigh in on this one.
 
Dec 30, 2020
128
378
116
Pacific Northwest
Could you post a video of his calls? Also what breed is he?

From what I’ve observed with my geese the loud honks are contact calls or sort of an “I’m here and all’s well.” It could be that he’s making sure the Canada goose is also alright, maybe he sees it as part of his flock, or maybe he’s also bonded more with you and is calling out to you for the same reason? Or he could be more obsessive with making sure his mate is safe at his side after what he’s been through?
Thats a good idea about posting a video, you'll have to forgive me in advance if it takes me awhile to post for I am still getting familiar with the layout and formatting of this website. My gander is an Embden.

I too thought that maybe it was a call to let the others know where he is and that everything is okay. But like I said, this same loud noise continues throughout the day in intervals when I approach him, give him cracked corn. He will do it straight out of a nap!

Oh gosh, as I'm typing 6:45am here western time he just began to sound his trumpet :idunnoits almost daily at this time that it usually begins. He's like my alarm clock now! It's nice when I want one but not so great when I want to sleep in!
 
Dec 30, 2020
128
378
116
Pacific Northwest
Yeah, there're really no snooze button on critters. My rooster, Sir Henry the Loud, likes to start crowing at about 3:30 or 4 a.m.; I used to get up that early for work before I retired. Maybe he's just trying to tell me to get a job!
Oh my gosh! I use to have two roosters, although unintentionally. I bought 10 sexed hens as chicks but ended up with 2 roos and 8 hens. I was happy to keep them as I enjoyed the character they brought to the flock and they were handsome, good guys (for the most part). They too would crow at 3-4am and my coop is right next to my bedroom. It drove me nuts, I was loosing sleep (light sleeper) so unfortunately Big Red and his pal who I never named became soup stock. I felt bad but the constant crowing and fighting on my small piece of property just wasn't ideal!

So, yes this is a better time for an alarm certainly ;) I'm usually up around this time anyways.
 

Goosebaby

Crowing
Nov 10, 2019
1,920
2,425
306
Northern California
Thank you everybody for your responses, all great perspectives and thoughts for me to carry on with. I will try and get a video posted on this thread so you guys can hear the specific sounds he is making :D
A lot of people have trouble posting videos here, so most of the time they post it somewhere on social media, Vimeo, or YouTube and post the link to it. Hope that helps
 

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