New Hampshire Breed for Exhibition & SOP

Matt1616

Songster
8 Years
Mar 8, 2011
533
149
153
South Alabama
Matt,

When you talk about the tails being too high on the New Hampshires, are you referring to the hens? I've heard that a high tail on the NH roo should be high for a quality bird.

Also, I'm a new backyard breeder, but trying to breed the best New Hampshires I can ... of the German line. Trying to figure out what I need to cull and what to keep in my flock.

If I were to attempt showing any of my birds, what feather characteristics should I be concerned with? You've done a great job explaining the depth of the ideal bird, tails, etc., but what about feathering? For example, I was told that if the feathers on the back of my NH roo laid straight rather than off to the side, he would be a better bird.

Any other tips for the ideal NH? I've saved the picture of the NH hen you posted, for comparison of my pullets and hen.

Thanks much!

I'm referring to Males or Females. They are suppose to have a 45 degree tail angle.

Matt
 

Matt1616

Songster
8 Years
Mar 8, 2011
533
149
153
South Alabama
I'm referring to Males or Females. They are suppose to have a 45 degree tail angle.

Matt

To clarify...a male New Hamp is suppose to have a 45 degree tail and the female is suppose to have a 35 degree tail. I was only referring to the males in my previous post. There can be issues in either Male or Females so it is always important to pay attention to both.

Matt
 

3riverschick

Poultry Lit Chaser
10 Years
May 19, 2009
8,453
3,294
512
Oh this is interesting. They used New Hampshire in this study.

Organic egg production. I: Effects of different dietary protein contents and forage material on organic egg production, nitrogen and mineral retention and total tract digestibility of nutrients of two hen genotypes
S. Steenfeldt
correspondence
email, M. Hammershøj
Received: March 19, 2015; Received in revised form: August 3, 2015; Accepted: August 4, 2015; Published Online: August 06, 2015
http://www.animalfeedscience.com/ar...7-8401_201511_209__&elsca4=Animal Science
 

pshay4

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 30, 2010
13
0
21
I'm in South Texas. I have some of the German New Hampshires that have not been crossed with any other strains. I am working to get them as close to the Standard as possible without bringing in other birds. I know that this will take lots longer, but I like knowing the variables. I am going for good type, first of all. I'm trying to get the best birds out of the ones who are developing quickest. I'd like them to have the traits that they were originally developed for, as well as good looks. I appreciate having a forum where others are working on the same goals.
 

Egghead_Jr

Crowing
10 Years
Oct 16, 2010
7,446
3,463
436
NEK, VT
Matt-

Whenever I look into a breed it seems you have them. Not only do you already breed them but are breeding quality stock. Of anyone to ask some questions your the man. This thread is a bit dead but perhaps you'll see this. Who knows, maybe kicking the tires with get this thing running again.

On your New Hampshire do you have growth weights you can share? Many folks are interested in heritage birds for back yard meat. True dual purpose. Historically this was the New Hampshire and Plymouth over New Hampshire sport of Delaware. If anyone isn't going to lose sight of this fundamental trait of fast maturity when breeding to SOP it's going to be you.

Is your line getting to the standard weights of the 50's? That would be butchering at 12 weeks, live weights around 6 lbs and carcass averaging 4 lbs. Found 1951 reference of 1.81 Kg dressed at 12 weeks which is 3.99 lbs. Any weights you'd like to share to show the current status of this breeds potential?

With the two lines of Reese, what I assume most have, and German which was the faster early growth?

Come to think of it don't you have White Plymouth Rock too? How do they compare in weights for butchering time line? White Rock being one of the few true utility birds left at SOP I can think of.

That's a lot of questions and I appreciate any info and all of your time.



Thank You
 
Last edited:

Sydney Acres

Songster
Jun 24, 2012
1,410
491
231
Western WA
Matt-

Whenever I look into a breed it seems you have them. Not only do you already breed them but are breeding quality stock. Of anyone to ask some questions your the man. This thread is a bit dead but perhaps you'll see this. Who knows, maybe kicking the tires with get this thing running again.

On your New Hampshire do you have growth weights you can share? Many folks are interested in heritage birds for back yard meat. True dual purpose. Historically this was the New Hampshire and Plymouth over New Hampshire sport of Delaware. If anyone isn't going to lose sight of this fundamental trait of fast maturity when breeding to SOP it's going to be you.

Is your line getting to the standard weights of the 50's? That would be butchering at 12 weeks, live weights around 6 lbs and carcass averaging 4 lbs. Found 1951 reference of 1.81 Kg dressed at 12 weeks which is 3.99 lbs. Any weights you'd like to share to show the current status of this breeds potential?

With the two lines of Reese, what I assume most have, and German which was the faster early growth?

Come to think of it don't you have White Plymouth Rock too? How do they compare in weights for butchering time line? White Rock being one of the few true utility birds left at SOP I can think of.

That's a lot of questions and I appreciate any info and all of your time.



Thank You

I have also been looking for a heritage breed that can grow on pasture (with supplemental feed, of course) and produce a 3-4 pound dressed carcass in 12-14 weeks. Have been looking for a Delaware flock that does this, but all the flocks I've found are slower maturing than that. Am considering the NH. Not concerned about the colored feathers of the NH affecting carcass appearance, as I'm just wanting to fill my own freezer instead of market the slaughtered chicken. Am currently working with Red Dorkings (a very slow and painful hobby) and Speckled Sussex (much easier than the Dorkings, but still take a bit longer than ideal to raise strictly as a meat bird). I'd like to get away from the meat hybrids, but we eat a lot of chicken and my summers are short in western WA. I hate starting chicks early in the rainy spring, and really hate butchering in the rainy fall season. Any recommendations for a flock that will fit my goals?
 

Berisas

Hatching
6 Years
May 25, 2013
9
3
9
Hi sorry to cut in on your conversation but, I may have something you are interested in. I am raising some delawares that meet the standard weights and also new hampshires that also meet the old standard weights I can send you info of my records on age and weight tomorrow, if you are interested. I am into breeding meat birds, my foundation is delawares and red new hampshires, and white rocks. I have been pleased. My Delawares I think are pretty nice, and seem to be of the older lines as far as weight color and comformation. according to some of the old timers. I am breeding next mont if you are interested
 

Sydney Acres

Songster
Jun 24, 2012
1,410
491
231
Western WA
Hi sorry to cut in on your conversation but, I may have something you are interested in. I am raising some delawares that meet the standard weights and also new hampshires that also meet the old standard weights I can send you info of my records on age and weight tomorrow, if you are interested. I am into breeding meat birds, my foundation is delawares and red new hampshires, and white rocks. I have been pleased. My Delawares I think are pretty nice, and seem to be of the older lines as far as weight color and comformation. according to some of the old timers. I am breeding next mont if you are interested

I would LOVE to see your records, and some pictures if you have them. Where are you located? Are you NPIP certified? If I were interested in your birds, do you ship eggs or chicks, or do you only sell selected pairs/trios/quads? I am in western Washington, about 1 hours north of Seattle.

Have you joined the Delaware FB group? We are trying to find flocks that are productive and meet the SOP guidelines. We would love to see pictures of your birds and have you share growth records. The group is named Delaware Poultry Club United. It is a closed group but you can put in a request to join.

And welcome to BYC!
 

Matt1616

Songster
8 Years
Mar 8, 2011
533
149
153
South Alabama
Matt-

Whenever I look into a breed it seems you have them. Not only do you already breed them but are breeding quality stock. Of anyone to ask some questions your the man. This thread is a bit dead but perhaps you'll see this. Who knows, maybe kicking the tires with get this thing running again.

On your New Hampshire do you have growth weights you can share? Many folks are interested in heritage birds for back yard meat. True dual purpose. Historically this was the New Hampshire and Plymouth over New Hampshire sport of Delaware. If anyone isn't going to lose sight of this fundamental trait of fast maturity when breeding to SOP it's going to be you.

Is your line getting to the standard weights of the 50's? That would be butchering at 12 weeks, live weights around 6 lbs and carcass averaging 4 lbs. Found 1951 reference of 1.81 Kg dressed at 12 weeks which is 3.99 lbs. Any weights you'd like to share to show the current status of this breeds potential?

With the two lines of Reese, what I assume most have, and German which was the faster early growth?

Come to think of it don't you have White Plymouth Rock too? How do they compare in weights for butchering time line? White Rock being one of the few true utility birds left at SOP I can think of.

That's a lot of questions and I appreciate any info and all of your time.



Thank You

Egghead, I am sorry but I do not weigh my birds. It is not necessary for what I do with them. Type is paramount when breeding to the standard. I would however assume that they are at or a bit above standard weight at the proper ages because my New Hamps mature very quickly. Your assumption about the "Reese" line being what most people have would be false...probably 85-90% of the New Hampshires being shown are primarily the German line. My line is crossed German and American but not the "Reese" line of Americans but they are probably 80-90% German. The American line that mine are crossed to is the line that the Halbach's had for years which is the same line that Buddy Hudson had.

Matt
 

Fentress

Songster
7 Years
Mar 22, 2012
588
86
168
Chesapeake, Va.
Matt- 

Whenever I look into a breed it seems you have them. Not only do you already breed them but are breeding quality stock. Of anyone to ask some questions your the man. This thread is a bit dead but perhaps you'll see this. Who knows, maybe kicking the tires with get this thing running again.

On your New Hampshire do you have growth weights you can share? Many folks are interested in heritage birds for back yard meat. True dual purpose. Historically this was the New Hampshire and Plymouth over New Hampshire sport of Delaware. If anyone isn't going to lose sight of this fundamental trait of fast maturity when breeding to SOP it's going to be you.

Is your line getting to the standard weights of the 50's? That would be butchering at 12 weeks, live weights around 6 lbs and carcass averaging 4 lbs. Found 1951 reference of 1.81 Kg dressed at 12 weeks which is 3.99 lbs. Any weights you'd like to share to show the current status of this breeds potential?

With the two lines of Reese, what I assume most have, and German which was the faster early growth?

Come to think of it don't you have White Plymouth Rock too? How do they compare in weights for butchering time line? White Rock being one of the few true utility birds left at SOP I can think of.

That's a lot of questions and I appreciate any info and all of your time.

I hear ya!
I'm starting my fourth season, and do not have what I consider a DP bird, and I don't think that I my expectations are unreasonable. I have stadard bred BR and they are huge, make good roasters, but that is about it. So slow. Will take a closer looks at them as fryers this year, but I expect they will lack meat at that age. I don't want give up on standard bred poultry!!! I encourage Matt to share some production results this season on his NH. A still tender chicken at 16+ weeks would be ok with me.

Thank You
 

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