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New peacock, yellow stool

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by percypea, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. percypea

    percypea Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 10, 2015
    Hello,

    I've just brought two new peacocks home to join my lonely yearling. However one of them seems to have a yellowish stool, that dries white. I know this can be a symptom of blackhead so I'm obviously worried as I've only just got him and he's going to be mixing with the other new bird and my original peacock. Apart from the stool he appears fine - perky, alert, moving around and exploring his new home. His wing feathers are occasionally a bit low but it is a hot day so he might be cooling off. We saw the other birds where he came from and all seemed active and alert, running up and down the pen they were in. He has been calling and eating. Considering he's in a new environment and had a 2 hour journey in a box he seems surprisingly fine. Is it possible it's just a reaction to the stress of the move? Would it be possible for him to have blackhead and yet seem to well?
     
  2. Dany12

    Dany12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sometimes it's only the stress! ... transportation .... new place!
     
  3. percypea

    percypea Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 10, 2015
    That's what I was hoping. It's good to know those sort of symptoms can be caused by stress, it would make more sense with the rest of his behaviour which seems bright and healthy.
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Keep an eye on him. Dehydration can also produce some interesting looking poop.

    -Kathy
     
  5. percypea

    percypea Out Of The Brooder

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    Will do! There are two water supplies in his enclosure and I've seen him drink since he arrived so hopefully if that is the problem it will sort itself out. Would the warm weather/dehydration explain the sometimes drooped wings?
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    It could. How warm is it?

    -Kathy
     
  7. percypea

    percypea Out Of The Brooder

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    About 21/22 degrees celsius maybe? Admittedly not that warm for many parts of the world but a hot day in Britain. Also they were in a box in a car, which while air conditioned may have exacerbated the problem. He doesn't seem any worse tonight so fingers crossed he'll be ok tomorrow. Thank you for your help, it is very reassuring to talk to someone who has more experience than me!
     
  8. percypea

    percypea Out Of The Brooder

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    Just thought I should post a follow-up in case anyone with similar symptoms finds this post. My peacock seems even happier this morning - he is holding his wings much higher and I haven't found any yellow stools. It's been even hotter today so I think it must have been caused by stress/dehydration from being transported and put in a new place. I'll keep a close eye on him just in case but fingers crossed he's ok and seems to be enjoying his new home.
     
  9. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi @percypea , glad your new boy is doing better.

    x2 on @casportpony 's suggestion to keep a close eye on him. Sometimes blackhead (histomoniaisis) can lie hidden as the bird's immune system keeps it more or less in check, then can erupt when the bird goes through a period of stress. As you mention, getting caught (particularly for a bird which is not frequently handled), stuffed in a box, traveling and having to adjust to new buddies are all stressful events, as is a change in temperature different from the temperature to which the bird has been accustomed.

    Stress all by itself can cause the bird's poo to change, even without a disease organism -- we've all experienced the immediate poo (mostly worn it, lol) from a just-caught, frightened and upset pea [​IMG]

    To make a long story short, yes, it is possible for them to have blackhead and not be showing much in the way of symptoms. Do you have appropriate medications on hand? Metronidazole plus an antibiotic for the secondary bacterial infections.

    Also, since the two birds are new to your flock, you will certainly want to worm them (even if the seller has done so, or has said he/she has done so). A five day regimen of fenbendazole, followed by another 10 days later, would be wise. You can use ivomec spot on to get rid of any external parasites such as lice, but don't count on it for getting rid of the worms. Regular worming with a wormer such as fenbendazole is your peas' best defense against blackhead, by keeping the worms which carry the histomonas protozoa at bay. Never follow any instructions which call for putting fenbendazole in water unless it is the special aqueous formulation of it -- we can't get that version easily here, but it is more available in the UK I think. It is new and should make life easier. If you need help with dosage amounts, we can help, or you can do a search here on the peafowl forum -- it is a frequently answered question.

    Stress can also cause an outbreak of coccidiosis in an adult bird, so you will also want to have some amprolium on hand as well as something like dimethox, sulmet or trimethoprim.

    Congrats on your new boys! Now you just need girls...
     
  10. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh good news! Lol, we were posting at the same time [​IMG]
     

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