New project: mixing local breeds from around the world

Thomas of Myr

Hatching
Jan 16, 2020
2
5
6
Breda, the Netherlands
So past March I was in Marrakech and
started to look around town at the local chickens and it occurred to me that wherever I have been around the world there always is some local variety of chickens, either landrace/feral or specifically selected for its local conditions. So I started to wonder what would happen if I would take some of the eggs home from my travels. Of course this would probably result in a flock of interesting looking birds with no specific purpose... But still the idea for my little global feral chicken project was born. Talking to a old lady just outside of the city resulted in me buying 12 eggs. Sadly enough 10 eggs didn't survive the long journey home and only one of the remaining eggs turned out to be fertilized and so my little rooster was born. But without any females my little project was at a standstill
Screenshot_20200116_145919.jpg


Fast forward a couple of months to Christmas last year. When spending my family holiday in the mountains of Norway I started to talk about my little project with a local show bird breeder. He told me about a farm nearby that had been abandoned for the past 8/10 years. The only thing remaining there was a group of feral chickens that had managed to live out there without the influence or help of humans. So I when looking for this farm and found it there was a small group of chickens living there (30/35 birds) most of them where black and way to feral to get close enough to make a couple of pictures. So I went in to the old farm house and found a couple of old nesting spots. And two new ones so I took 6 of their eggs and brought them home. This time I was in luck because al the eggs survived the journey. And all 6 of them turned out to be fertile. They are do to hatch out next week.
IMG_20200116_133731.jpg


Hope to keep you all updated and included in the projected and I would love to hear your thoughts about it
 

Kabootar

Songster
Aug 15, 2017
269
641
220
Bihar India
So past March I was in Marrakech and
started to look around town at the local chickens and it occurred to me that wherever I have been around the world there always is some local variety of chickens, either landrace/feral or specifically selected for its local conditions. So I started to wonder what would happen if I would take some of the eggs home from my travels. Of course this would probably result in a flock of interesting looking birds with no specific purpose... But still the idea for my little global feral chicken project was born. Talking to a old lady just outside of the city resulted in me buying 12 eggs. Sadly enough 10 eggs didn't survive the long journey home and only one of the remaining eggs turned out to be fertilized and so my little rooster was born. But without any females my little project was at a standstill
View attachment 2003748

Fast forward a couple of months to Christmas last year. When spending my family holiday in the mountains of Norway I started to talk about my little project with a local show bird breeder. He told me about a farm nearby that had been abandoned for the past 8/10 years. The only thing remaining there was a group of feral chickens that had managed to live out there without the influence or help of humans. So I when looking for this farm and found it there was a small group of chickens living there (30/35 birds) most of them where black and way to feral to get close enough to make a couple of pictures. So I went in to the old farm house and found a couple of old nesting spots. And two new ones so I took 6 of their eggs and brought them home. This time I was in luck because al the eggs survived the journey. And all 6 of them turned out to be fertile. They are do to hatch out next week.
View attachment 2003746

Hope to keep you all updated and included in the projected and I would love to hear your thoughts about it
It's going to be an interesting thread. Everyone needs to have a pet project. Yesterday I had a passing idea of developing a new buffalo breed. Moving on I think you should once visit India you will find some famous world famous breeds like Aseel, some nationally recognised breeds like Kadaknath, a pure black breed kept by tribes of central India. Ghaghu kept by tribals of South India, Kashmir faverolla in Kashmir and if you are lucky enough you may even find now almost extinct Busra breed. You can also find tons of landrace breeds. India is home to both Red jungle fowl and Green jungle fowl, the ancestors of domesticated chickens. I strongly suggest a trip.
 

EverythingZen

Songster
Nov 29, 2017
108
202
137
AU
How on earth do you get these eggs through customs?!? Actually, don’t answer that. It’s not my business :lol:

your rooster is gorgeous. Can’t wait to see what hatches from those new eggs!
 

Kabootar

Songster
Aug 15, 2017
269
641
220
Bihar India
How on earth do you get these eggs through customs?!? Actually, don’t answer that. It’s not my business :lol:

your rooster is gorgeous. Can’t wait to see what hatches from those new eggs!

Yeah I have been told that importing hatching eggs and poultry from the old world is prohibited because of the Avian flu epidemic in Europe and Asia.
 

Thomas of Myr

Hatching
Jan 16, 2020
2
5
6
Breda, the Netherlands
Well within the EU people are allowed to take groceries over the borders. Norway is technically not a EU member but still its Europe.
The eggs from Marrakech I just gave to a friend who was driving to the Netherlands with some new furniture for his family. He was checked at the border but nobody asked any questions about it...

Maybe I just have been lucky until this point 🤔

Now I know they allow you to import hatching eggs from Asia, if you have a permit and are okay with a special EU appointed veterinarian to check out the eggs for any diseases (they have to break 20% to 35% of the eggs to make sure that everything is safe) the cost of this all could run up to be €5.000,- I have a friend who breeds Ayam Serama's as show birds he did import eggs once but because of the high cost and low survival rates decided to never do it again
 
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