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new to chickens... have a question

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by showjumper_girl2002, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. showjumper_girl2002

    showjumper_girl2002 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    hello everyone. i've hatched a few sets of chicken eggs for the first time. the first set is grown up and there is one rooster. the second set is getting older but i've kept separate from the first guys since they are so much younger and smaller right now. how do i acclimate them so they can all be together without fighting once the younger ones are old enough and is it even possible to house the two sets together when they didn't grow up with each other? also i've noticed i have 4 roosters in the younger bunch. what should i do with the roosters? they can't all be housed together right? the one rooster is already aggressive to seeing the younger chickens, even just to hearing them. any opinions and advice is greatly appreciated [​IMG]
     
  2. fargosmom

    fargosmom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can introduce the newer birds to the older ones once they're all about the same size . . . start off by letting them free-range together under supervision. There will be some fighting as they figure out a new pecking order, but that should subside fairly quickly. You just need to make sure that if there's any blood drawn you remove the injured bird or it will be a target for all. Once they all seem to be getting along ok you can try letting the new ones into the coop first, let them get familiar with it, then let the older birds in. They'll work it out for themselves, though, so just observe and follow your instincts. As for roosters I can't have any, so my only experience with them is trying to get rid of 'em, which isn't easy unless you don't mind if they get eaten. You can process them yourself, have them processed for you, or offer them to whoever wants them. Keep in mind if you try to re-home them, it's pretty hard to find anyone who wants them as pets, but it can be done if you're patient. It seems like there are always too many roos . . . good luck with yours.
     
  3. showjumper_girl2002

    showjumper_girl2002 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok thanks for the advice! [​IMG]
     
  4. NC ChickenKate

    NC ChickenKate Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you want or need that many roos? Roos are only needed if you insist on hatching out your own chicks or are into breeding a certain type. If not, sell them or give them away on Craig's list or by posting an ad card on the bulletin board of your local feed supplier. Get them gone so you can have an easier time getting the two age groups acclimated to one another.
    Yes they can spend out of the coop time together as long as there is plenty of room for the younger ones to get away from the older ones. The top older chicken/hen may feel the need to bother the younger ones just to make sure they know who's in charge...but if you can distract the her with some especially tasty treat she'll likely ignore the youngsters.
    When it comes time to have everyone live together in the same coop, move the youngsters in at night after the oldsters have gone to roost...easier to move the youngsters in while they are semi comatose too.
    Chicken psychology being what it is, when everyone wakes up the next morning..."how it is is what it is" and as long as you let the entire flock out nice and early (you don't want squabbling to start when the oldsters get impatient to be let out) and have many more feeding and watering stations available so no one is left out.
    The process takes some planning and maneuvering on your part but as long as your coop will handle the increase in numbers without over crowding, you can get it done.
    Hope that is helpful...best of luck with all things chicken!
     
  5. SteveBaz

    SteveBaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The roosters are hard to find homes for and one of the best ideas is to go to the country for the day and just go find a few farms that may take them in. You have to have the guts to go up to the houses and ask if they or other neighbors they may know but most folks will at least list.

    As far as the little kids I would say do not mix them together the other flock will slaughter them without an introduction of a couple of weeks. Make a make shift run next to the other run and put the foods opposite each other. The food is the most dangerous area bc the pecking order dictates who gets to eat first and it is not the kids its the top of the order and if they at least see the kids around while they eat they will get used to them being around. Then after a week or 2 or even 3 put a couple of the low on the pecking order and you know who is the kindest girls on the block in with them to play or out to play depending on your set up. You must be around ready to jump in if necessary and play referee. Then let them out in the run and referee with all the girls to see how the dominant girls react to the kids and be there to jump in and see who the highest on the pecking order has a problem with them. I have an old milk crate with the side cut opened with a jig saw and the kids can run in there but the big girls can not. I had a ton of obstacles for them to run around and hide behind etc. Good luck it takes time and patients.
     
  6. showjumper_girl2002

    showjumper_girl2002 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    looks like i have some work cut out for me [​IMG] thanks!
     

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