Newbie Question - what breeds to get??

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by new2chickens, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. new2chickens

    new2chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    129
    1
    129
    Mar 2, 2008
    So actually I have a couple questions:
    I love Cochins (How do you pronounce the name...I don't want to sound like and idiot if I decide to get some chicks!!)

    Second: Tractor Supply Co is having Chick Days soon (got the flyer up on my fridge!!!) and hubby is going to let me get 3 females and 1 male (if they allow choice between sexes...if not I will get them elsewhere)
    My question is:
    I am wanting to keep my 2 mixed hens and probably get rid of my 2 roos so I can raise up my own roo that I am not afraid of (I know what a wuss) We might plan to try raising some chicks in the future so I am wanting to get 2 or all 3 hens of one breed and then the 1 roo of the same breed. We will eat the mix eggs and probably some of the pure eggs. Ok so now my question...I thought about getting bantam easter eggers...if the male mates with the mix females will their eggs still be brown or will they be tinted like the EEs??? I really would like to have the pure eggs be a different color than the mix. I think the hens breed determines the egg color..so the mix would stay brown...but I have NO idea!!

    Another:
    Could I have my 2 mixed hens, 2 EE hens, 1 cochin (I just love em) hen, and the 1 EE roo. What color eggs do cochins lay??

    Sorry about the scatteredness...it comes from a scatter brain!!

    Sarah
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2008
  2. chickflick

    chickflick Overrun With Chickens

    4,624
    162
    291
    Mar 10, 2007
    Dimondale
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  3. lauralou

    lauralou Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,833
    21
    181
    Dec 10, 2007
    Central Virginia
    Sarah,

    I don't know anything about Cochins, except they sure are purty!

    But seriously, I can answer one question for you. If you breed your current mixed breed hens with an easter egger rooster, it won't change the color of the eggs that your current mixed breed hens lay. They will continue to lay the same color eggs. But the chicks hatched out of those eggs might lay green eggs.
     
  4. new2chickens

    new2chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    129
    1
    129
    Mar 2, 2008
    Awesome! Thanks my main concern about the egg color was so I could tell which eggs had parents of the same breed and which eggs were from the mixed hens. May hatch out the same breed eggs and will eat, give away, sell the mixed eggs.

    Sarah
     
  5. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,906
    143
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Quote:I already made that mistake when I called Ideal to place my order and included a cochin for a BYC friend. According to that lady it's 'Coach - In'. She told me this after she picked herself up off the floor from laughing.
    Keep in mind, small chickens = small eggs. That's why I decided to go with standards. We eat alot of eggs.
     
  6. ksacres

    ksacres At Your Service

    4,230
    14
    231
    Nov 16, 2007
    San Antonio TX
    Cochins lay a tan to light cream egg. I would consider them "tinted" not brown.
     
  7. new2chickens

    new2chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    129
    1
    129
    Mar 2, 2008
    If I have standard hens and a bantam roo can he still breed them??

    Sarah
     
  8. LinckHillPoultry

    LinckHillPoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 17, 2008
    Pennsylvania
    what colored eggs do you want?

    also size of egg: small, medium, large, JUMBO
     
  9. new2chickens

    new2chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    129
    1
    129
    Mar 2, 2008
    Color and size really don't matter to me, except that I was hoping to have a way of distinguishing my mixed breed hens eggs from the future hens and roo (of the same breed)

    I hope that made sense!!
     
  10. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Egg colors can slightly change tint as the birds age and there is no garuentee the offspring will lay eggs a different color than the parents as the egg color has a few genes controlling it. However, if you don't have too many birds, it can be done.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by