Newly hatched chicks with Wry Neck, Genetic issue vs nutritional?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Cowgirlgrace, Dec 7, 2010.

  1. Cowgirlgrace

    Cowgirlgrace Chillin' With My Peeps

    Six months ago I purchased Mille Fleur Bantam Cochin eggs from a breeder and more than half hatched out with Wry neck. I euthanized them thinking it was a neurological defect. Contacted the breeder and she said she had hatched some with that also. Said she found the hen throwing those and culled her from the breeding group. Also in researching read about the vit B, E etc treatments in older birds but havn't read anything about it in newly hatched chicks. So, the one surviving pullet from my hatch who never exhibited symptoms is now laying. She bred with an unrelated roo from another MFC breeder. Today those eggs are hatching. So far two chicks hatched and one with wry neck. Two still to hatch. If this is happening with newly hatched chicks is this a hereditary issue? If I eliminated all that hatched with it the last time how is this pullet carrying this problem if born normal and bred with an unrelated roo? Should I eliminate all birds from this breeder, I have two roos from her also? I have other MFC from two other breeders with no problem and have never seen this problem in any of my other breeds. Should I try the vitamin treatment or does this pretty much sound like a genetic thing in this particular line?
     
  2. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    I'm sorry to say, but I have always heard wry neck is a genetic issue. It also can be caused from trauma at birth, but I'd say in birds, and at the rate you're seeing - It is a genetic trait. We once got some BBS Ameraucana chicks, one had a weird neck jolt thing it was doing, so when I worried and researched of the issue, I found it was genetic, so I was very worried I had to cull the chick and possibly its hatch mates.

    Luckily it did not actually have wry neck. So sorry to hear of such large losses though! [​IMG]

    I would say have the breeder track down all the sources, and just stop breeding that line.
     
  3. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I would have to agree it sounds genetic because so many were born with it.

    Vitamins can help neurologic disorders (not to be confused with a genetic defect), such as an injury (a vaulted bird getting pecked on the head) and causing this symptom.

    In older birds, I have seen stargazer developed from thiamine deficiency. This can happen if birds are kept on medicated (amprolium - thiamine blocker) chick feed too long or a bird may have a metabolic issue with it. Removed from the medicated feed and put on vitamins resolves it within a couple weeks completely.
     
  4. Cowgirlgrace

    Cowgirlgrace Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks for the responses as the info on BYC seems to be strictly nutritional instances in older chicks and chickens. The breeder I purchased from is just as baffled as I am as all her birds were prurchased from the same breeder and that breeder is claiming he does not have a problem. Even if it is a nutritional issue it has to be genetic based as the hen seems to have the inability to pass the lacking vitamins on to her chicks even though she is fine. Must be something that requires 2 genes? I originally thought the roo she bred to was unrelated because her roo hatchmates are submissive to a very dominant unrealated roo (wasn't planning on any serious breeding until spring so they are all together but couldn't help myself on this hatch)and he is very restrictive as to the others approaching his hens. But it is possible she bred with a hatchmate when the other roo wasn't looking. They are confined due to mud so it would have been obvious to the dominant roo. Of the 5 eggs that hatched today 3 are normal, 2 have wry neck. Going to separate this line from the rest. Not sure I want to experiment as they may all carry a recessive and can incorporate it in the other lines. Too bad as these birds have nicer type than my other lines. Was looking forward to useing them. Wish there was a genetic expert experienced with this who can shed more light on this. Would like to know how this develops and what other breeds it is a genetic issue with and how prevalent it is. Illia, where did you find more info in this?
     
  5. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    I vote for nutrition.

    Vit. E, B Complex and selenium should take care of it in a few days. You must be diligent and give it 3 times a day. See this link under Crook Neck:

    http://www.browneggblueegg.com/Article.html
     
  6. Cowgirlgrace

    Cowgirlgrace Chillin' With My Peeps

    There is lots of nutritional info out there regarding this problem but they are all on older birds. I have not found anything about people experiencing this on chicks coming out of the shell with these symptoms.
     
  7. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    The findings of mine were simply by looking up "wry neck" on google, then trying with adding "genetic" or "birds" or such. In a lot of cases it is indeed a deficiency and even from trauma, causing damage to tendons and/or muscles, but in birds that is less likely, and with deficiencies - I would have to say if this were so, it would be because the original breeder has their birds on a poor diet, causing pale egg yolks with little nutrients. That, or a problem with the temp in the incubator. But of course, again, if the breeder is also noticing the problem - It has got to be genetic.
     

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