now i remember why I hate incubating in May/June

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by llaaadyel, Jun 1, 2011.

  1. llaaadyel

    llaaadyel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2010
    Lower NY
    I have been using the same hovabator for years without any issues. The weather has been crazy here in NY, one week its 60 then this week its 90+. Our central air is going crazy. I have the bator full and one night it spiked to 102 and now last night it went down to 98. It will be a miricle if these eggs hatch. Im so frustrated. I think I might actually move the bator to another room that has less temp swings.

    Just wanted to vent.
     
  2. squeak1387

    squeak1387 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2011
    bronson, fl
    I'm having the same problem so you aren't alone
     
  3. perrym1962

    perrym1962 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 21, 2007
    Eastview, Ky..
    Another reason I love my basement. The temps stay very close to the same.. I'm lucky... [​IMG]
     
  4. fatbassetvineyards

    fatbassetvineyards Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 15, 2011
    Redding CA
    It's June 1st and in California I had to start a fire! Can't wait to get to lockdown.... Day 15.
    Denise
     
  5. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 26, 2009
    Go to the hardware store and buy yourself a couple of 4 x 8 sheets of pink foamboard, the thicker the better, a roll or two of duct tape, and a good sharp utility knife.

    Make yourself a big box -- cut one sheet in half so that you have two 4 x 4 pieces. Cut the other sheet in half into two 4 x 4 pieces, then cut each of those lengthwise so you end up with four 2 x 4 pieces.

    Tape the 4 sides together into a box on the 2 foot side so you have a box that's 2 feet tall and 4 x 4 feet. Then, tape one of the 4 x 4 sheets onto it for a bottom. Then with your utility knife, cut out a small hole on one end about the 3 inches in diameter, towards the top of one of the sides, and a corresponding hole at the bottom of the opposite side -- this will allow just a little air flow and oxygen without too much temperature swing.

    Finally, put the whole apparatus on a stable surface in whichever room in your house has the least temperature swings, such as a basement. Put the incubator in it, centered as much as is possible, then put on the lid and use a couple of pieces of tape to hold it in place (you will need to take it on and off, so just tape loosely.

    This will greatly reduce the temperature swings. I would recommend that you run the incubator in place in the box for a couple of days with a few dummy eggs inside (store eggs or even something like a few small potatoes or a couple of ziplock bags with about a half cup of water in each) just to get the thermostat settings right before you put hatching eggs in it.
     

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