NPIP questions more or less my comments/observation

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by mustangsaguaro, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. mustangsaguaro

    mustangsaguaro Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For the last year I have been going back and forth on becoming NPIP certified in my state. I know there are both pros/cons on becoming certified.

    I have reasons why I don't want to become certified. The main reason is I don't want big brother to interfere w/ what I am doing. In other words if I am on the list of NPIP farms in the state they come in and say we are taking your birds for one reason or another. I'm pretty sure this hasn't happened but the way this world is going I think it is truly possible it could happen. I would rather fly under the radar if you know what I am talking about. I'm not doing anything illegal w/ my birds or anything I would just rather big brother not know.

    Does anyone else feel the same way I do and that might prevent you from joining the program.

    Besides knowing your birds are AI and Pullorum/Typhoid clean why else would you join? I personally don't introduce birds into my flock unless I hatch them myself.
     
  2. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    The thing with NPIP that bothers me is that once you get certification, you are not allowed to purchase birds or hatching eggs from anyone that is NOT also NPIP. IMO, that closes the door on an awful lot of good breeders. If I am not NPIP (and I am not), I can buy from anyone.
     
  3. mustangsaguaro

    mustangsaguaro Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes I do know that is one of the disadvantages of becoming NPIP cert. You can only buy birds from others that are certified as well.

    I have also been doing some reading on most of the states for shipping birds as well as eggs. And most states if not all state in order for fertile eggs to come into the state they must come from a NPIP cert. flock.My question though is how many states actually enforce this rule/law? There might be some like Va. and Tx I think these 2 states are pretty strict but what about other states? I don't and never plan on shipping live birds but I do ship eggs all the time. I don't ship to states that are pretty strict about it though. But I am sure there are ways of getting around that too.
     
  4. Woodysgirl29

    Woodysgirl29 Out Of The Brooder

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    I am also considering certifying my flock because I am getting chicks next year to sell at a swap and if I want to sell one or two of my current girls they would need to be NPIP. But so far I can't figure out where, how or what needs to be done to achieve this
     
  5. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    At one point Pullorum/Typhoid was so widespread that many large flocks were wiped out & there was the possibility that all chickens would be eliminated. The NPIP program succeeded in defeating this threat saving the poultry industry. At this point it's very unusual for the testing program to identify a positive bird. All it will take for Pullorum/ Typhoid to become a problem again is for people to stop testing & share untested birds with others. In no time at all we could be seeing the return of an epidemic.
    By buying birds from people who don't test you are running the risk of introducing P/T into your flocks.
    The fear of the government deciding to take away everyone's poultry flocks was pretty widespread when NAIS was being discussed as well but no one was ever able to tell me why the government would want to do that or what would have to happen to the Constitution to allow that to happen.
     

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