Ok Turkey experts....I need help on this one.

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by Struttn1, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. Struttn1

    Struttn1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Black Spanish gobbler has what appears to be blister-like lesions all over his waddles. I have raised turkeys for years and have never seen anything like it. He acts and looks (other than the blistery bumps} fine. He eats well and struts and gobbles all day long.

    Does anybody have an idea what this is and if it is contagious and also how to treat it? I have to work all weekend but I will get a couple of pics to post to see if anybody can identify what it is. [​IMG]
     
  2. Pine Grove

    Pine Grove Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pox??
     
  3. Struttn1

    Struttn1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 4, 2008
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    I don't know what it is.
     
  4. Struttn1

    Struttn1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good call Pine Grove. I found this after you mentioned pox. I think I am dealing with the dry form of fowl pox. We have lots of misquitoes. Time to vaccinate. So far the one is the only bird I have with the blister like warts.

    Fowl Pox
    Synonyms : chicken pox (not to be confused with chicken pox in humans; the human disease does not affect poultry and vice versa), sore head, avian diphtheria, bird pox
    Species affected : Most poultry -- chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, ducks, psittacine, and ratites -- of all ages are susceptible.

    Clinical signs : There are two forms of fowl pox. The dry form is characterized by raised, wart-like lesions on unfeathered areas (head, legs, vent, etc.). The lesions heal in about 2 weeks. If the scab is removed before healing is complete, the surface beneath is raw and bleeding. Unthriftiness and retarded growth are typical symptoms of fowl pox. In laying hens, infection results in a transient decline in egg production (see Table 1 ).

    In the wet form there are canker-like lesions in the mouth, pharynx, larynx, and trachea. The wet form may cause respiratory distress by obstructing the upper air passages. Chickens may be affected with either or both forms of fowl pox at one time.

    Transmission : Fowl pox is transmitted by direct contact between infected and susceptible birds or by mosquitos. Virus-containing scabs also can be sloughed from affected birds and serve as a source of infection. The virus can enter the blood stream through the eye, skin wounds, or respiratory tract. Mosquitos become infected from feeding on birds with fowl pox in their blood stream. There is some evidence that the mosquito remains infective for life. Mosquitos are the primary reservoir and spreaders of fowl pox on poultry ranges. Several species of mosquito can transmit fowl pox. Often mosquitos winter-over in poultry houses so, outbreaks can occur during winter and early spring.

    Treatment : No treatment is available. However, fowl pox is relatively slow-spreading. Thus, it is possible to vaccinate to stop an outbreak. The wing-web vaccination method is used for chickens and the thigh-stick method for turkeys older than 8 weeks.

    Prevention: Fowl pox outbreaks in poultry confined to houses can be controlled by spraying to kill mosquitos. However, if fowl pox is endemic in the area, vaccination is recommended. Do not vaccinate unless the disease becomes a problem on a farm or in the area. Refer to the publication PS-36 (Vaccination of Small Poultry Flocks) for more information on fowl pox vaccinations.
     
  5. wilds of pa

    wilds of pa Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hi, Any pic's of it you can share..Like to see what you are dealing with.. or you can PM me them as well..

    Thanks
    Charlie
     
  6. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Very interesting. Thanks for the education on pox struttn. Hope your bird gets better soon. Do they recover?
     

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