Ok What is lockdown?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Bucky182, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. Bucky182

    Bucky182 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Could someone please explain to me what lock down means and what it entails?[​IMG]
     
  2. begbfg

    begbfg Barnyard Beckie

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    Excellent question. I know what it is and sort-of why we do it BUT since this is my first time hatching eggs, I don't really know how to explain it. Hopefully, soon, someone with more hatching experience will answer your question. [​IMG]
     
  3. abbylane35

    abbylane35 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm pretty sure it refers to the time when you stop turning the eggs, stop opening the incubator for any reason, and raise the humidity slightly so that the chickies can hatch [​IMG] I've never called it that, but from what I can gather, that is what it is.
     
  4. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    Lockdown is when you take the eggs out of the turner on day 18, if you are using a turner or stop hand turning the eggs to get them set for hatching and increasing the humidity.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2011
  5. Komaki

    Komaki Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lock down helps the fuzzies orient up right also.
     
  6. AlienChick

    AlienChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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  7. Ukiah

    Ukiah Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Basically, lockdown is the last 3 days of incubation. So for chicken eggs, lockdown begins on the 18th

    day of incubation. You stop turning the eggs and remove the egg turner if using one, so that

    the chicks can position themselves for hatching. Increase the humidity and keep the incubator closed.

    Your 'Locking down' the incubator, which I guess, is why they call it 'lockdown'.

    Ukiah
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2011
  8. CarolJ

    CarolJ Dogwood Trace Farm

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    Quote:X2 It's a time of great anticipation because you know the hatching is just a day or two away. When I did lockdown last hatch - I got everything ready (labeled egg cartons, water, etc.), opened the bator, removed the eggs directly into the labeled egg cartons (top of carton removed) - I label the cartons by breed so I'll know what they are when they hatch, and the cartons keeps the unhatched eggs from being rolled around by hatched chicks. I removed the turner, covered the wire mesh on the floor of the bator with paper towels (makes it easier on the chick's feet), added water/wet sponge, put the egg cartons in the bator, put the top back on - made sure the temp/humidity monitor was in there. And then kept it shut until the chicks hatched.

    ETA: I opened the top a couple times during lockdown to add water to keep humidity high - only a couple seconds each time - temp and humidity weren't affected at all.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2011
  9. sixshooter60

    sixshooter60 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lockdown refers to the last 3 days of incubation.. It is how the hen does so it was adapted to do it in an incubator.. a hen setting a clutch of eggs will roll the eggs around with her beak and will get off the eggs to eat and drink and poop. but if you keep track of the time she started to set and when you put eggs under her or let her keep her own on about the 18th day she will not roll the eggs and will not get off the eggs until they hatch..so basically thats why its done the same way in an incubator to imitate the hen
     
  10. waw

    waw Chillin' With My Peeps

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    with a broody hen how do they hatch with a better rate usually since she turns them in what one would call lock down
     

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