Olive and Pink egg Layers

Discussion in 'Chicken Breeders & Hatcheries' started by 3Sues, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. 3Sues

    3Sues New Egg

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    Sep 7, 2013
    Parachute, Colorado
    Looking for olive egg layers and pink egg layers in Colorado. Anyone know where I can purchase pullets that lay these eggs?
     
  2. Incukahlan

    Incukahlan Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 17, 2012
    Phoenix, AZ
    Well Olive Eggers are harder to come by being that they are mixed, so you will have to find someone that breeds them. Not a breed that you can just go online and order, or one that you will see listed for sale very often. Pink egg layers are also hard to come by. There are certain breeds that can lay a pink tinted egg, but it's just a light brown egg with a more pinkish hue. Some Easter Eggers have the possibility of laying a pink egg, but again pink/or pink tinted eggs varies from bird to bird, not breed. That one is usually up to chance. Your best chance will be finding breeds that lay tinted or light brown eggs. Sometimes those carry the pinkish hue. Again, it varies from bird to bird. You will most likely not be able to just get a chicken and know that it will lay a pink egg. Sussex, Brahmas, Easter Eggers, Barred Plymouth Rocks, and Silkies are some of the breeds just off the top of my head who I know have the possibility of laying a pinkish colored egg. Hope this helps! [​IMG]
     
  3. 3Sues

    3Sues New Egg

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    Sep 7, 2013
    Parachute, Colorado
    Thanks. I did find some online but shipping to colorado was outrageously expensive
     
  4. LBejaran

    LBejaran Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2013
    Deep South Texas
    You know what's really odd? I actually have some Naked Necks that lay pinkish eggs. I know they are brown eggs, but one has such a thick bloom on it that it looks like a beautiful pink. You can wash it and it'll look a little more like a light brown color, but it still has that pink hue to it. I'm not entirely sure why, though. I think I was just lucky when I bought them.

    This was on the Olive Egger breed page.

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    [​IMG]
    Wonderful Creatures

    Posted 4/11/13
    By Queen of the chickens
    Pros: Good Winter Layer, lays a medium to large egg, friendly and sweet.
    Cons: Some uncertainty of what you will get with your cross.
    I have been breeding my own version of these birds by crossing both Silver Laced Wyandottes and Black Australorp Roos with my Wheaten EE hens. I end up with these gorgeous blue birds or blue laced white birds. They are so pretty. I even ended up with a rumpless roo during one cross. My EEs lay a light green egg. My Olive Eggers lay a really pretty Khaki green egg, not as dark as some I have seen, but still pretty. "

    I don't know if it'll help, but it could be a way of eventually getting what you want. It may take some breeding (which could take a couple years), but it might be worth the effort. There may be some breeders who breed selectively for olive eggers, but I don't know any in Colorado. I'm kinda far off over here in Texas, haha!
     

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