Openions needed

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by crooked stripe, Oct 2, 2008.

  1. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Chillin' With My Peeps

    846
    3
    161
    Jan 14, 2008
    N.E Ohio- Suffield
    I have a broody that has hatched out 7 chicks. I let the broody and the chicks out of their cage to free range with the other chickens. Momma has cleaned a couple clocks as the other hens come to investigate. Now the other chickens leave the chicks alone when free ranging. Will the other chickens tolerate the new chicks this fall and winter when in the coop? When the other hens come close, momma fluffs her feathers and the hens do nothing but look. I sure hope this is the first sign of getting along. John
     
  2. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

    23,384
    34
    351
    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    It would depend on how big your coop is. I had a hen that would not even let my other chickens get off the roost. AT ALL. I ended up letting them out to free range, or they would have surely starved or dehydrated to death! You might think of having a cage inside the coop, or making a different pen outside the coop for mama and her babies. The other hens have learned not to mess with them, but they have a lot more room to avoid when free ranging, so keep that in mind. [​IMG]
     
  3. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Chillin' With My Peeps

    846
    3
    161
    Jan 14, 2008
    N.E Ohio- Suffield
    I have the broody and chicks in a seperate cage that has a door leading to the coop. The cage is just screened in and the coop is enclosed and insulated. I was planning on opening the small door to the coop and let them live together this winter. Here are some pics of my set up. Let me know what you think. John

    [​IMG]
     
  4. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Chillin' With My Peeps

    846
    3
    161
    Jan 14, 2008
    N.E Ohio- Suffield
    [​IMG]
     
  5. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Chillin' With My Peeps

    846
    3
    161
    Jan 14, 2008
    N.E Ohio- Suffield
    [​IMG]
     
  6. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Chillin' With My Peeps

    846
    3
    161
    Jan 14, 2008
    N.E Ohio- Suffield
    [​IMG]
     
  7. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

    23,384
    34
    351
    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    It would really depend on the hen. I have one now that doesn't even pay attention when another chicken is bothering her chicks, unless the little one starts crying really bad. you could try letting them out supervised, and see how it goes. The little ones should be pretty close in size by around 2 months, and should be fine then. It really just depends on how protective the hen is, and how persistent the others are. Good luck!
     
  8. Farm Chic

    Farm Chic Out Of The Brooder

    88
    0
    39
    Aug 21, 2008
    Davisburg, MI
    how high is your roost??? that seems really high for your girls?? do they fall off?? I have a black silkie bantam hen and she has trouble getting on a our roost that is only 18" off the floor?? jsut curious, we have 15 new regular size hens that we will be introducing to our bantams this fall/winter.
     
  9. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

    23,384
    34
    351
    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    Quote:Silkies can't fly, their feathers can't carry them. My chickens roost in the barn rafters, that are about 8-9 feet up. Even the little ones (2 mo. old standard game and bantam) can get up there. I also have a standard cochin that gets up that high. She has to jump on the feed barrels, but she gets there!
     
  10. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Chillin' With My Peeps

    846
    3
    161
    Jan 14, 2008
    N.E Ohio- Suffield
    Farm Chick my roost is 5' off the coop floor. All but 1 hen uses it as seen in the pictures. I built the feeder she sits on extra large so I don't have to fill the feeder every day. The feeder lasts 10 days with 10 lbs of feed so long as the hens forage out doors. I sure hope the chicks live in harmony all winter long. John
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by