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Opinions Please

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by enggass, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 8, 2010
    Mid-Coast Maine
    What do you all prefer and why?
    Windows that swing up with hinges on top? Or windows that swing down with hinges on bottom? Pros? Cons?
    Thanks.
     
  2. M.sue

    M.sue Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2011
    Michigan
    It didn't matter to me when we were building our coop. I just wanted Good ventilation, some sunlight, and predator proof. My DH bought some clearance windows from Home Depot or Lowes to put in ours. They are regular windows that you'd put in house, garage or shed. They are easy to open/close, look nice and easy to clean. I guess what type of window you go with would have to do with the design/looks of your coop. [​IMG]
     
  3. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    These are not store bought. I made them - wood framed with plexiglass for light. Hardware cloth will be on the inside of window.
    I would think if they were hinged on the top and swung up, it would be better for having open during rain etc... but if they were hinged on the bottom, it might be better for ventilation having the opening at the top... hmmmm???
     
  4. PonderingChick

    PonderingChick Out Of The Brooder

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    Lacey, WA
    I have been debating this same question. I am going to attempt to make my own wooden frames with plexiglass too. I think I am going to do hinges on the side so that they can swing open and rest against the body of the coop when open. I am going to figure out a hook to hold them open so I do not have to worry about them swinging out and being in the way of traffic and such. I think I would prefer this for air flow, ability to clean both sides of the window and I am going to use the hardware opportunity as accent and decor on the coop.

    Do you by chance have any pictures or pearls of wisdom you could share on how you built your windows?
     
  5. Chucken

    Chucken Out Of The Brooder

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    NorCal SF East Bay
    If windows are your only means of ventilation, then the higher the opening the better as far as removing stale air or heat, but I really don’t think there would be any difference if they swung from the top or bottom. You still have the same size hole. The windows on the coup I am building hinge at the top, but I will also have ventilation all along the top of the front and back walls (shed roof).

    PonderingChick, I've posted how I built my windows on my "Jen's Hen Pen" post in this section.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2011
  6. M.sue

    M.sue Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2011
    Michigan
    We have a over hang on our coop so rain isn't a problem. I would think that if you didn't have a overhang windows that flip up would be your answer. It would also provide some shade and help keep the coop cooler while allowing ventilation oon those hot days.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2011
  7. catsew

    catsew Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2011
    Thank you as we were also debating this same question.
    Here are some pics of coops we have seen with the 2 different ways you describe.
    We are also planning on using plexiglass framed with wood. Although its that plastic stuff for greenhouses, not technically plexiglass, but I think it will work just as well.

    Hinged so it opens down. [​IMG]

    And the chain so it opens up. [​IMG]
     
  8. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mid-Coast Maine
    I will have a shed roof as well so there will be plenty of ventilation at the top and eaves. There will also be some overhang, but even with overhang, wind can blow rain sideways as well as we all know. Especially during a good Nor'easter here in Maine.
    I guess I am realizing it probably doesn't make much difference.

    One thing to consider is how it will be held open. If hinges are at the bottom, I can just let it hang straight down if I want it all the way open, or use a chain and hook to keep it partially open. On the other hand, if it is hinged at the top, I will need some way to keep it opened or propped open... I guess it will be a last minute decision.

    As far as my plexi windows go, here's what I did. I did not want to cut the plexi so I approached it this way... for an 18" x 24" piece of plexi, I framed my opening to be 19" x 25". This allows a half inch all the way around the plexi when the window is shut flush. To create the window frame, I made the outer dimensions of the window frame 4" greater than the plexi size or 22" x 28". I then cut an opening using a jigsaw that was 3" in on all sides or 16" x 22". This opening size allows for one inch overlap of the plexi on the inside for fastening to the plywood (I used 19/32" plywood)... Anyway - I'm sure this is very hard to follow on a forum. I hope it made some sense. Oh yes, don't forget to seal/caulk in, out and around...

    Steve
     
  9. xyresicchick

    xyresicchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Providence, RI
    i would do one that opens up if i were adding something permanent. but i keep mine open 24/7 in the warm months and close up the north window all the way in the winter, and just cover the south side window with straw when it gets below freezing in january and february. works fine for me, but you're in ME and i am in RI so there is a temp difference for sure. I am about 1/2 mile from the water here but i'm on bay water not ocean water.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2011

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