Oxine AH to sterilize/clean between flocks?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by CountryFried, May 30, 2011.

  1. CountryFried

    CountryFried Out Of The Brooder

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    My flock's history, along with the necropsy results is here: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=458822

    I'm
    still losing chickens, 2 this week. They appear perfectly fine one day and are dead the next. We are sooooo frustrated, we've been doing Denagard in preventative doses. I'm at a loss, there's no signs in advance to try antibiotics, although I prefer to avoid those.

    Hubby wants to cull, we have 50 new chicks (WELL away from the others!) we were going to do a separate flock with, but hubby and son are so frustrated with them just dropping dead, they vote to just cull, clean the coop, and then put the babies in there when they are bigger and we're sure it's clear of the Myco.

    So, my question is, if I use Oxine, I know without activating it, I can spray it around the chickens, but if I'm not going to have chickens in there when I clean the coop, and for however long afterward, should I activate it?

    How long do I need to wait after cleaning to put new chickens in there? Is there a difference in wait time between activated and non-activated?

    Is Oxine AH the best thing to clean the coop between flocks?

    Thanks for any advice
     
  2. Anianna

    Anianna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I believe Oxine AH is the best thing to use in your situation. It is a biocide as well as a disinfectant, so it will kill bacteria, mold, and even stuff like mites. I would say to wait a day or two after disinfecting with activated Oxine AH (it is my understanding that when HVAC systems are cleaned with Oxine, it's generally over a weekend without building closures). Unactivated, it is safe to use around animals and there is no wait time, but, in your situation, I would recommend using the activated Oxine without any animals around to better ensure you get whatever could be affecting your flock.

    Also, what bedding are you using? Straw can be problematic because it is not absorbent and can mold. Cedar can cause respiratory distress, also. I would recommend switching to pine shavings if you are using straw or cedar. If your coop has any cedar or pressure treated lumber, air it out for at least several days. Treated lumber can outgas and cause respiratory distress. You may need to replace treated lumber inside an enclosed coop with wood that isn't chemically treated.

    Do you free range? Some plants such as dogbane, hemlock, and jimson weed are toxic to chickens if they are eating it. Here is a list of plants that can harm chickens. I don't know that many can cause respiratory illness, though.
     
  3. CountryFried

    CountryFried Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I use peanut hay in the nest boxes, and any treated wood in my coop has been there for years (like more than 10). My coop isn't an enclosed coop, it's only got one solid wall, the others are 4' plywood (not treated, painted with barn paint) high, and then hardware cloth to the roof, with open gate areas at each end. I "built" it under an existing roof. I actually quit letting my flock free range about a month and a half ago, in preparation for getting more chicks, I didn't want the entire property contaminated. We made a small area outside the coop on Friday that we "fenced" with light plastic mesh (bird mesh like you'd use over strawberries), so they finally got to go out to play again yesterday and today. Unfortunately I can't identify plants to save my life, I've no clue if any of the ones on the list are in that fenced area, but it is mostly grass and a wild black/raspberry vine.

    Thanks so much for the answers, I guess I will order the Oxine this week [​IMG]
     
  4. Anianna

    Anianna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm really sorry you have to go through this. I hope disinfecting does the trick.

    You can also keep Oxine (without activator) on hand in case you end up seeing illness in the new flock. Check this link out for information about using Oxine to fight infections in your flock.
     
  5. harleygurlsc197

    harleygurlsc197 Out Of The Brooder

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    I just ordered Oxine from Amazon. I would like info on dosing. How much per gallon to use for sterilizing the coop, how much in drinking water and do I need to use to citrus acid with it or just the Oxine and water mix.
     
  6. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    You'll see directions on the label when you get it. It is 3.25 ounces per gallon of water for premise treatment. You can use 10 grams per gallon of citric acid to activate it, but it is not necessary. It must be a plastic pump type sprayer. I use a pump sprayer to disinfect premises. Go to the link posted by Anniana in post #4. K.J. Theodore is well known in the world of chickens. I've been using Oxine for years. The OP need to take a dead bird and have it tested for disease to see what you are dealing with. Here is a list of labs by state: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_dis_spec/poultry/downloads/labs_app.pdf
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
  7. cbryan5

    cbryan5 Out Of The Brooder

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    I've got a question, on the the oxine label it says something about mixing crystals. Is this necessary or does it work just as well with oxine itself?
     

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