Pasteurized Eggs?

Tivona

Songster
8 Years
Jun 2, 2011
601
63
181
Oregon
I eat my own home grown eggs raw. I just made a garlic mayonnaise last night that came out lemon yellow color because the yolks on the eggs are such a deep yellow color.

But anyone who is publishing a recipe and advised the reader to eat raw eggs would be begging for a lawsuit. Someone will mishandle the raw store bought eggs and get sick and then call their lawyer.

So, Peaches Lee, it all depends upon how you feel about the safety of the eggs you are producing.
Sad but true. That is why I any recipe I share always has the eggs fully cooked. Personally I fine raw eggs gross so I always cook mine fully anyway but many would eat them raw thinking that problems like salmonella happen to someone else.
 

Imp

All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle
11 Years
Sep 7, 2008
14,453
148
318
The Emerald City
My Coop
My Coop
Salmonella, and other similar food borne illnesses, are found both on the shell and in the egg.

The reason there are special rules for these breaker plants, is that the machines that crack the eggs are not like cracking a few in your kitchen. They are basically broken up and the shells are strained out of the pooled eggs. So even something as rare as salmonella becomes much more of an issue when a million eggs are exposed to the other million eggs and the shells. That is why they are required to pasteurized the eggs.
Coddling raw eggs greatly reduces the (already extremely rare) risk of using raw eggs, but thorough cooking and proper handling is the only way to eliminate it.
Many commercial operations are being required to use pastuerized eggs, for the safety of their customers. Like hospitals, daycares, nursing homes etc.

Imp
 

Peaches Lee

Songster
9 Years
Sep 19, 2010
1,938
451
236
Pennsylvania
I eat my own home grown eggs raw. I just made a garlic mayonnaise last night that came out lemon yellow color because the yolks on the eggs are such a deep yellow color.

But anyone who is publishing a recipe and advised the reader to eat raw eggs would be begging for a lawsuit. Someone will mishandle the raw store bought eggs and get sick and then call their lawyer.

So, Peaches Lee, it all depends upon how you feel about the safety of the eggs you are producing.
Garlic mayonnaise, that's sounds delicious!!
 

Oregon Blues

Crowing
8 Years
Apr 14, 2011
5,531
233
273
Central Oregon
I just use my regular mayonnaise recipe and add two mashed garlic cloves and blend them in until they are liquified before I start adding oil.

Garlic mayonnaise is a great dip for french fries. I used this batch to make coleslaw and also put it on burger and fried eggs sandwiches with cheese.
 

Supernatural

In the Brooder
9 Years
Aug 7, 2010
62
3
43
Des Moines
Imp: Thank you.

Am I wrong in assuming salmonella is more common in large factory farms? Is this because of high contamination of feces and multiple birds, or is salmonella simply common in chickens inherently?

Is there reason for someone with a small flock of healthy birds to be concerned with foodborne illness from undercooked eggs?
 

cassie

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 19, 2009
6,103
2,261
401
There is no reason to assume your home produced eggs are not contaminated with salmonella, and there is no reason to assume they are. I would think salmonella, if any, would be on the shell. Just be careful how you break them. Salmonella and other foodborne pathogens are not something I worry about. I grew up drinking raw milk and eating our chicken's eggs, some of them raw in eggnogs and mayonnaise, and I am still alive.
 

Imp

All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle
11 Years
Sep 7, 2008
14,453
148
318
The Emerald City
My Coop
My Coop
Imp: Thank you.

Am I wrong in assuming salmonella is more common in large factory farms? Is this because of high contamination of feces and multiple birds, or is salmonella simply common in chickens inherently?

Is there reason for someone with a small flock of healthy birds to be concerned with foodborne illness from undercooked eggs?
I have not researched it, but I think you are correct that Salmonella would be more likely and likely to spread in factory farm conditions. That has been posted before by others as well.
I eat eggs cooked soft from my chickens; and before I had chickens, I ate store eggs cooked soft. I also have a family recipe that uses raw eggs. I do now coddle them.
So I guess I am not concerned for myself. At a minimum I would inform others if there are undercooked eggs in a dish.

Imp
 

wyoDreamer

Crowing
9 Years
Nov 10, 2010
4,753
5,881
411
NE Wisconsin
I don't worry about the samonella on store bought eggs too much, but I can't wait till I have my own chickens laying eggs just for me.
If I am doing a recipe that doesn't cook the eggs, like my Irish Cream recipe, I use EggBeaters because they are pastuerized. The taste is a little off, but the safety factor works for me. Enough irish wiskey in mix also helps.

Here is my take on the issue:
Samonella is naturally occuring in the environment. I can be exposed to it many times a day in many different ways. For me, the two main differences between store bought eggs and home raised eggs is the conditions that they come from and the number of people handling the eggs.

Home grown eggs are laid by a chicken in a fairly clean environment, in a fairly clean nest, being fed fresh, healthy food (that goes straight from the bag to the feeder). The eggs are gathered by me, with my fairly clean hands and put in my fairly clean basket to go to my fairly clean kitchen where I make some seriously delicious food from them.

A store bought egg is laid by a chicken stuck in a cage, usually with other chickens, where the egg rolls across the bottom of the cage to a conveyor belt where it joins a thousand other eggs laid by a thousand other chickens. The conveyor takes it through the laying house to a machine that processes many thousands of eggs from across an entire egg farm every day. That is machine is not cleaned and sanitized every day. There are a number of workers at the chicken farms doing a number of chores - delivering feed, handling the feed, removing manure, handling dead chickens, setting mouse traps, fixing machinery, sorting eggs, packaging eggs. The list goes on. The eggs are then shipped to a warehouse, where they are then stored until put on a truck and shipped to the grocery store where they are stored until they are put out on the shelf for me to buy.

There are so many points on this chain of events where the eggs can be exposed to contaminates that if I am going to use the store eggs raw, then I want it pasturized.
 

rikithemonk

Songster
7 Years
Apr 19, 2012
279
24
101
Mont Dora Florida
Recipes that require pasteurized eggs or cartons of eggbeater do this because the recipe wont cook the eggs well enough to kill bacteria. For instance I came across a no cook recipe for french silk pie. It called for a carton of eggbeater. pasteurized eggs are coated with a thin layer of wax and every egg in the carton is stamped with a red P inside a circle.

Riki
 

ChooksinChoppers

Songster
8 Years
Mar 24, 2011
1,892
94
216
Ocala, Florida.
To pasturize your home grown eggs, all you have to do is hold them up in front of your face and wave them from side to side...there ya go...they are now "past your eyesed" LOLOL Sorry couldnt help it!
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom