Peeling, scabby, sore duck feet! Advice very welcome please.

blackandtan

Crowing
Aug 30, 2016
597
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Thunder Bay Ontario canada
I don’t know about duck feet particularly, but in terms of general wound care:
-no more swimming
- black tissue appears dead, will probably continue to fall off
-looks like there is some pink granulation tissue (healing) there, which is a good sign
- IF she was mine, I’d wash her feet in an antiseptic solution, pack with polysporin (or neosporin or other antibiotic ointment) then wrap her feet, keeping toes gently separate and change bandages daily
I don’t think webs will grow back, but I can’t see that being a problem for a pet duck’s swimming, I’m sure she’d manage a tub or little pool

Like I said, I’m no expert but I do know how soft their little feeties are and I think bandages and ointment will provide the best environment for healing :)
Best of luck!
 

Team PJ

Chirping
Feb 1, 2019
23
122
69
I'd wondered that about the webs :( it looks so so sore.

We live in the South West of England. I'm not sure she'd have been exposed to anything cold enough to give her frost bite... she came inside just before the first really cold snap happened about a week ago.
 

PirateGirl

Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist
Premium member
Mar 11, 2017
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South Park, Colorado, USA
I agree that it looks like extreme frostbite. Webs will not grow back. Depending how deeply the tissue is damaged she may or may not lose toes entirely. Your biggest issue is going to be watching for signs of infection. Infection could go systemic and if it develops I would highly recommend a vet for antibiotics. Also with frostbite it is crucial not to allow her back in cold temperatures until fully healed or the problem can be made worse.
 

Jpat

i like ducks 🦆🤪
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Apr 30, 2018
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Nova scotia
I don’t know about duck feet particularly, but in terms of general wound care:
-no more swimming
- black tissue appears dead, will probably continue to fall off
-looks like there is some pink granulation tissue (healing) there, which is a good sign
- IF she was mine, I’d wash her feet in an antiseptic solution, pack with polysporin (or neosporin or other antibiotic ointment) then wrap her feet, keeping toes gently separate and change bandages daily
I don’t think webs will grow back, but I can’t see that being a problem for a pet duck’s swimming, I’m sure she’d manage a tub or little pool

Like I said, I’m no expert but I do know how soft their little feeties are and I think bandages and ointment will provide the best environment for healing :)
Best of luck!
Great post!
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
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Nov 27, 2012
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I'm not sure she'd have been exposed to anything cold enough to give her frost bite... she came inside just before the first really cold snap happened about a week ago.
....and what temps were those?
I can't imagine anything but frostbite that would make the skin peel off like that.
You don't use any lime on the ground do you?

We live in the South West of England.
Here's how to add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, (laptop version shown), then it's always there!
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PirateGirl

Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist
Premium member
Mar 11, 2017
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South Park, Colorado, USA
It only has to be below freezing for frostbite to occur, not crazy extreme temps, so just below 32* F or 0* C. It does not necessarily take a long period of exposure and under the right conditions frostbite can occur in less than 20 minutes.

If not cold, then maybe a burn, from heat or chemicals could cause something like that. Either way, I'm thinking something environmental as opposed to disease.
 
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