Please Help! Hawk Attack - Can I use doxycycline?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by aknewlin, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. aknewlin

    aknewlin Out Of The Brooder

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    My question up front: Can I give my hen Doxycycline? I have some on hand.

    Background: We found one of our Lavender Orpington hens yesterday afternoon with some gashes on her side and back (along with a patch of feathers on her back missing). We are pretty sure it was a hawk attack. Three of the gashes are about 1" long, and one is about 2 1/2" long. The gashes are about 1/4" wide or so. A human would get stitches.

    1. We've separated her and have her inside in a cozy dog kennel.

    2. She is acting completely normal, like nothing is wrong. She has a good appetite and is drinking well. She has good body language. She is still the same this morning.

    3. We put neosporin (no pain relief) into the gashes last night and this morning. They look okay so far, and don't smell or look like they are infected. Probably too soon for that? They are still gaping open.

    4. I have 100mg capsules of Doxycycline on hand. They can be opened up and the powder put on something yummy or in her water. Can I give this to her to help prevent infection? How much and how often? Or should I not give her this antibiotic, and just keep with the neosporin?

    5. If I should NOT give her Doxycycline, I can make a trip to Rural King. And what should I buy (Tylan?) and how much dosage?

    Thanks in advance for any advice. I've tried looking through previous forums, but could only find spotty info on doxycycline.
     
  2. aknewlin

    aknewlin Out Of The Brooder

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    Just called Rural King. They don't have Baytril, but they have caramycin. Is that good for open wounds/infections?
     
  3. Akrnaf2

    Akrnaf2 The educated Rhino Premium Member

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    I would use antibiotic ointment 2 times a day after cleaning the wounds with worm water and soap and after disinfecting the wound with Iodine or something else. If you can cover the wounds whit some sterile gaze pad and some adhesive band its better! I would use oral antibiotics only if the wounds is infected. You must remember that the use of antibiotics orally can disrupt the equilibrium between the microbes and the fungi in the microflora of the chicken and it can results with proliferation of Candida albicans which is a fungus that can causes crop problems like crop bounding. so if you decide to give antibiotics you must give also probiotics and vitamins and an anti fungal treatment!(0.5 gram of Copper sulfate in one liter drinking water for 5 days) good luck!
     
  4. aknewlin

    aknewlin Out Of The Brooder

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    I was thinking the same thing about not using an oral antibiotic unless necessary. I've read so many stories where the chicken heals with just a little help from humans.

    We have added electrolytes and probiotics to her water just for good measure. Her poo seems to have gotten watery since last night, I'm assuming from the stress of injury and/or being inside? She had solid poos before bed last night.
     
  5. Akrnaf2

    Akrnaf2 The educated Rhino Premium Member

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    The antibiotic ointment is very important! You must spred it ASAP. Dont worry about the poo it shape can diverse greatly and the stess can infect greatly the chicken. Give here a lots of TLC ,good food (crushed boiled egg its wonderful! ) and good medic tretment and she will be OK!
     
  6. aknewlin

    aknewlin Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the advice I've gotten so far.

    Yes, we put a lot of ointment into the wounds. A LOT. :) I was fortunate enough to see photos of other people applying ointment, so I tried to mimic that. I squeezed the tube right into the gashes and filled them up.

    I've read different web sites and different forum postings till my eyes are cross-eyed. There is so much advice out there, but what you have listed so far seems to be the consensus.

    I feel lucky that she is in good spirits and not sickly. I think that will go a long way towards the healing process.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
  7. lalaland

    lalaland Overrun With Chickens

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    I've used nustock very successfully on hawk attacks before - some feed stores carry it - it used frequently on dogs and horses - but you can order it online. Even though you might not get to use it on this hen, it is well worth keeping on hand. The base is sulphur - you can also get pure sulphur in the garden section - just make sure it has only sulphur in it, and sprinkle that on the wound. This avoids antibiotic use, and it is extremely effective. It does have a very specific scent which some people don't care for - but medicine is medicine!

    good luck!
     

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