Plexiglass roof?

Chickenp00p

Chirping
Jun 4, 2020
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Hello, I am trying to design my chicken coop. I was looking at runs the other day and thought about using something like plexiglass for the cover/roof. I was wondering if there is any reason i couldn't do the same with a coop. I am totally new to this, so there might be some obvious reason why not, but i dont know what it is beaides possibly a greenhouse effect in the summer. However, the coop will be nestled in some trees and probably wont get much direct sunlight. We do get snow in thewinter, sometimes inches, sometimes feet. I would love some input from more experienced builders. Thanks!
 

Acre4Me

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
6,053
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Western Ohio
Greenhouse effect, yes. Very early rising chickens due to lots of natural light as soon as it starts to lighten in the am. Over time, the plexiglass will get scratched up and look less than attractive. Not sure if extreme temps negatively affect plexiglass -maybe it can crack due to expansion/contraction, not sure. However, when I’ve used plexiglass it does crack with just a little too much pressure, like when tightening downs screws.
 

Chickenp00p

Chirping
Jun 4, 2020
95
116
63
Greenhouse effect, yes. Very early rising chickens due to lots of natural light as soon as it starts to lighten in the am. Over time, the plexiglass will get scratched up and look less than attractive. Not sure if extreme temps negatively affect plexiglass -maybe it can crack due to expansion/contraction, not sure. However, when I’ve used plexiglass it does crack with just a little too much pressure, like when tightening downs screws.

Many good points, thank you!
 

3KillerBs

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Jul 10, 2009
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North Carolina Sandhills
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You haven't gotten your location into your profile yet, but if I used a clear roof in my climate the chickens would certainly cook in our hot summers.

There's a recent thread somewhere on the forums where a person with a clear roof is having trouble getting her chickens to roost. It *might* be because they don't feel safe and sheltered under a clear roof (or it might not).
 

Acre4Me

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
6,053
17,419
817
Western Ohio
I would use a regular roof- wood with shingles type roof. Moisture condenses in metal and you can have a real problem with that potentially. Of course, you could put metal sheets on top of plywood instead, but I would stay away from straight metal in a humid or 4-season area.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
95,254
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SW Michigan
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There's a recent thread somewhere on the forums where a person with a clear roof is having trouble getting her chickens to roost. It *might* be because they don't feel safe and sheltered under a clear roof (or it might not).
I think that was attributed to them being young and new to the coop and roosting.

We do get snow in thewinter, sometimes inches, sometimes feet.
No matter what you use for sheathing, make the roof framing strong, for feet of snow.
You could use an opaque corrugated sheathing, for more light less chance of heat gain.


Oh, and.... Welcome to BYC! @Chickenp00p
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
1591565809716.png
 

Chickenp00p

Chirping
Jun 4, 2020
95
116
63
I would use a regular roof- wood with shingles type roof. Moisture condenses in metal and you can have a real problem with that potentially. Of course, you could put metal sheets on top of plywood instead, but I would stay away from straight metal in a humid or 4-season area.

Interesting point, I didn't think about the moisture. Definitely learned something new and important there, thanks!
 

Chickenp00p

Chirping
Jun 4, 2020
95
116
63
I think that was attributed to them being young and new to the coop and roosting.

No matter what you use for sheathing, make the roof framing strong, for feet of snow.
You could use an opaque corrugated sheathing, for more light less chance of heat gain.


Oh, and.... Welcome to BYC! @Chickenp00p
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
View attachment 2182152

Thanks for the welcome. The framing is for sure going to be strong, I will look into the corrugated sheathing, thanks!
 

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