Point of laying in November?

Eric R

Songster
Jul 12, 2017
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Magnolia, TX
I have some black copper marans that should start to lay soon. Based on what I've read about November. But because of the lower daylight hrs, will this mean I'll need to wait until spring for eggs?
 

Farmer Connie

Gallus gallus domesticus
Feb 28, 2017
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Perhaps in theory as far as geographically.
Here in Fl., we grow tomatoes up until January if no frost until then. Our egg production gets effected around December... If I don't rig the timer to the Egg House lights.. which we do use.
Perhaps if you are in an early season change location, that might slow down your birdies system a bit.
 

GC-Raptor

Crowing
Jul 26, 2016
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Connecticut, USA
I bought day old Barred Rocks August 16, last year. They started to lay in January, right on schedule.
I do add light in the morning at 5 am year round. Sunset here in January is around 4:30 to 4:40 or so. So less than 12 hours of light.
I don't know about BCM. Never read up on them. GC
 

Acre4Me

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2017
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Western Ohio
It’s possible that you might be waiting, but a bit dependent on the individual bird, and hours of light. We’ve had Leghorns take 10 months to start to lay, while the other 5 breeds of same age were all laying by 6 months. So, that was individual variation since they were hatched in Feb. last year we got chicks in Sept, but they began to lay on schedule around 20 weeks, which was in Feb.

We do use supplemental light on a timer in the coop to achieve 14 hours of light per day during the fall/winter/spring. We have one 60watt bulb in the coop.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
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Maybe, maybe not. I had a chicken start to lay the day after the solstice, another in January, one in February. Soooo... they could be delayed, but it doesn’t necessarily mean waiting until spring either.
.....and you do not use supplemental lighting?


But because of the lower daylight hrs, will this mean I'll need to wait until spring for eggs?
It's really hard to say. Supposedly pullets can lay thru their first winter, without supplemental lighting.
Also hard to say what is the most important factor, duration of light per day, or if it's increasing or decreasing daily...both seem to have an affect.
I've tried several different lighting schemes, not well designed or documented, but have given up drawing any concrete conclusions.
Just keep them well fed and housed, and see what you get and when you get it.
Marans are not stellar or prolific layers, especially if not from hatchery lines, so take that into account too.
 

SurferchickinSB

Crowing
Feb 23, 2018
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California
I have some black copper marans that should start to lay soon. Based on what I've read about November. But because of the lower daylight hrs, will this mean I'll need to wait until spring for eggs?
My black copper Marans used to lay eggs almost every single day! She was my best layer for the first year, laid all thru winter until she went to broody and now she doesn’t lay any eggs. I even had to buy her two little babies so she would snap out of it.I live in California and I do not use any type of supplemental lighting.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
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I do NOT use supplemental lighting, but perhaps of note, all of my late layers started AFTER days started getting longer again, even though it was still winter.
Thanks, just wanted to be sure.
Yes, I've had them start just after solstice too, even with supp lights.
Gives credence to the increasing day length theory, as does molting in July.
Most of us don't notice the difference, but they sure do!
 

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