pole-barn type construction?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by ki4got, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Apr 24, 2011
    Roanoke VA
    I was looking over some different designs, and noticed a few pole-type structures.

    my question here is, what kind of poles/posts/whatever would you use?

    I have LOTS of trees on my 26 acres, including a bunch of cedars and smaller pines that are pretty straight, 3-6" diameter trunks. Could I use any of these do you think? if so would you strip the bark off or leave it? we also have a variety of other wood types but not much that grew straight. although we could probably find some maple or oak if we looked hard enough I guess... there are parts of my property that I've never seen yet, in the 12 years that i've been here... it's very steep and thickly grown in places.

    thanks in advance for any thoughts/suggestions.

    Karen
     
  2. flnatv

    flnatv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I went ahead and used treated 6x6 and 4x6 for my pole barn. It made it easier to attach the trusses and the outside boards.

    I honestly don't know what most people use, but I will tell you that I used cedar posts for my fencing because they last longer than other raw woods.

    Unless your pine is treated... I'm not sure how long it will last... it is a pretty soft wood.

    Good luck and keep us posted on how it turns out.
     
  3. Toothless Willie

    Toothless Willie Out Of The Brooder

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    Best hardwood is Hickory followed by Tulip/Yellow Poplar. Best un-treated softwoods are Redwood and Red Cedar. De-barked is preferable as leaving the bark on retains moisture in the sap wood and encourages insects, mold, and mildew.
     
  4. giggleboxfarm

    giggleboxfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We are doing a pole barn, the poles and the bottom hanger, which is touching the ground, are red cedar. Everything else is poplar. We are getting them from an amish mill down the road. I wanted to avoid pressure treated wood.
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Cedar posts are valued for their longevity. Ask around the neighborhood and see if any of the old timers have used the local cedar to make posts. I'm guessing they have, and someone likely even cuts and sells them locally. I'd use cedar, even over most treated lumber, especially if I had enough on my property to get them merely for the labor.
     
  6. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    Quote:Id use the cedar. But doesn't freshly cut wood have to be cured a while before using it. Like say for about six months.... Just to keep it from warping and cracking?

    Just curious do you have the equipment to saw three foot six diameter trunks into boards?
     
  7. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Roanoke VA
    perchie.girl :

    Quote:Id use the cedar. But doesn't freshly cut wood have to be cured a while before using it. Like say for about six months.... Just to keep it from warping and cracking?

    Just curious do you have the equipment to saw three foot six diameter trunks into boards?

    that was 3" to 6"... i've never seen a 3' 6" cedar before... heck i'd sell that and use the money to BUY a coop... LOL

    and yes, it does help to season them some, but we have several dozen pine and cedar already cut and laying where they fell from last fall, so i'd say they've seasoned just fine. I was just wondering if the cedar or pine could be used for pole barns, since we've already got them cut, but if hard wood was better we could go in search of it... otherwise we were going to have one heck of a burn pile later this summer.​
     
  8. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    Quote:LOL.... Whew. I'd still use the cedar.
     

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