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poop question

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by domromer, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. domromer

    domromer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 11, 2007
    Flagstaff,AZ
    My girls are about to move outside in a few weeks. We will be using a tractor and a staionary coop for the night. I'm going to use the tractore all around the yard and on my garden beds. I would also like to use the poop that is cleaned out of the coop.

    I was wondering how other gardners use the chciken poop. How do you age it? and for how long? Also do you include the bedding ( pine shavings) or try to seperate it from the poop.

    I'm interested in the whole permaculture thing and want to start it off right as I am new to both chcikens are gardening.
     
  2. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I just set my coop on a plot for a few months and move it so they can fertilize a new section. At the end of every year, I turn over and plant on where the coops were the year prior. I dont age or compost, just turn over or plant right into the old litter. On the most freshest plots, I plant zucchini's as they do well with rich manuer.
     
  3. pattycake

    pattycake Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 7, 2007
    fingerlakes, ny
    I am also interested in permaculture, and chickens are a part of my grand scheme. Right now I'm composting the litter from my brooder, and I intend to continue to do that when they move into their permanent coop. However, I'm also planning to put together a tractor for summer use. I'll put a half dozen chicks in each one and set in on a future garden bed. Once they eat the grass and thoroughly fertilize that patch of grass (a week or two? I don't know yet), I'll cover it with mulch and let it sit over the winter. And the tractor will move on to a new patch of grass.
     

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