Possible Leghorn bantam pullets/hens

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Tacampbell1973, Oct 13, 2013.

  1. Tacampbell1973

    Tacampbell1973 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have tried to post pics of these girls here before but were not good pics. Hard to get them to stand still. Very timid, have voices that sound croaky like a frog.Was told silky/cochin but other members and I have determined not. Have booted shanks and not laying yet. Look very much like another members leghorn bantam. can anyone help?
     
  2. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    They look like hatchery White Cochins to me.
     
  3. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Both looks like hatchery-quality White Cochin bantams.
     
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  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree, they appear to be White Cochin bantams, hatchery quality.
     
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  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Leghorns have clean legs, are lean built. These birds have feathered legs, are rounded and fluffy. These are hatchery cochins.
     
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  6. hope4rainbow

    hope4rainbow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nevermind. My phone made the pic more blurry blowing it up so I could be seeing wrong.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2013
  7. Tacampbell1973

    Tacampbell1973 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So by hatchery that means of a lower quality than a breeder? Is that a bad thing? I only wanted them for pets really. Do I not want to let them hatch out eggs? Well actually it might be a moot point because to date I have had them for three months or so and have not seen a single solitary egg. They ffreerange throughout the day, but my husband and I have scoured the yard and nothing. I guess these birds fit right in with my flock . They are all sort of different in their own ways. a crossbeak hen the size of a robin that looks and runs like a roadrunner, a rangy mean older game hen cross, a fat fluffy GL cochin that eats everything in sight, a Polish Crested with the traditional funky hairdo, three GL cochin brothers that mount anything that moves and now these two that croak like bullfrogs. Yep they fit right in, one big happy family. OR a motley crew however you choose to look at it. [​IMG]
     
  8. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes, "hatchery-quality" means that the birds aren't really suitable for showing. They may not be fluffy enough, for example, or they may have other defects (like extra toes, etc). They represent the breed, but not perfectly. Birds from breeders show the characteristics that you want to see when showing. They are "better" if you are going to show, but for most people, hatchery-quality birds are fine, as people just want a bird that has some of the breed characteristics.

    I've heard that Cochins make excellent mothers. So, if you decided to let them hatch some eggs, they would probably do a pretty good job. I would wait until spring or summer to let them hatch eggs, however.
     
  9. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    You are correct. Hatchery-quality birds are not generally bred for showing, so they can have any number of defects or even disqualifications. For example, hatchery-quality Rhode Island Reds are a brick red color instead of the correct deep mahogany color, and hatchery Wyandottes often have single combs instead of rosecombs (this is a DQ when showing poultry). Other common "problems" with hatchery birds include improper body type (shape), lack of foot feathering, deformed feet, and otherwise wrong coloring. Hatchery birds represent the hatcheries' impression of what a breed of chicken is supposed to look like. Breeder/show quality birds are bred to be competetive at poultry shows and confirm to the American Poultry Association Standard of Perfection.

    Having hatchery-quality birds is fine for most people who just want a friendly, beautiful flock of chickens. But if you want to show chickens, buying them from a breeder is a must. Your Cochins should be a great part of your flock, even though they aren't up to show standards. Also, if you ever want to hatch some chicks, Cochins are the way to go--in my experience, they go broody often and (while I've never let mine do this), appear to make good mothers.
     

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