Possible sick hen.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by RedNewcomer, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. RedNewcomer

    RedNewcomer Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 17, 2014
    Marysville Ohio
    Hello everyone. Needing advice for a sick hen. I just recently acquired four hens from a family member. Rhode Island Reds. They have adiquite water and feed at all times , clean bedding and the ability to free range if they desire. When I first received the hens I did notice one had a small patch of feathers missing of her rear end. At a closer look you could see she was bleeding , I'm assuming from the others pecking. A few days later things are looking better for her but I new issue had arisen. A different hen was found laying in a corner with a slimmy substance behind her. I looked closer to see if it were droppings and it did look like so only clear. When I looked at her vent she had a milky discharge and it was red and swollen. Since I am new to raising chickens I need all the advice I can get. Thank you all for your time.
    Raleigh
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC. I would bet that the first hen was feather picked, possibly due to a lack of protein in the diet, a lack of room to forage, or from boredom. Hatchery RIR are not full blooded RIR, but essentially a red production bird that lays a lot more eggs, and they can be a little more aggressive than the old fashioned RIR of the past. I would give them 20% Flock Raiser or an all flock feed with crushed oyster shell in a separate container for calcium. Some high protein snacks would be sunflower seeds, good quality dry cat food, or gamebird feed 24% or higher if you can't change the feed. Provide rocks or roosts to climb on and make sure they have plenty of room. Free ranging can cut down on pecking. The second hen could have vent gleet from your discription. She should get probiotics in her diet, and after getting her bottom cleaned up and dried, you might try some antifungal ointment on her bottom such as Miconazole (drugstore) or Nustock (from a feed store.) Make sure that your feeders and waters are regularly cleaned and have fresh water daily. Also consider treating your new chickens for coccidiosis, since they have just moved to your property, and may not have immunity to the cocci in your soil. Corid or amprollium 1 tsp powder or 2 tsp of liquid per gallon water for 5 days is the treatment. Here is some info about vent gleet: http://www.tillysnest.com/2012/12/vent-gleet-prevention-and-treatment.html
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2014
  3. RedNewcomer

    RedNewcomer Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 17, 2014
    Marysville Ohio
    Thank you for all the information. After posting that I did look at the breeds a little closer and I believe your right about them being production reds. I am going to look closer into the vent fleet. Thanks again for your help.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    You are welcome. When a flock moves from one piece of ground to another, there can be a new strain of coccidia in the soil since there are 9 strains that affect chickens. Most chickens by 11-20 weeks old have become immune to the strain in their soil, but if they come in contact with a new strain, they can get sick. Just watch for the symptoms in my last post. Corid (amprollium) is sold in packets of powder or bottles of liquid in the cattle section of most feed stores. The heritage RIR are quite docile and calm, and even the roosters tend to be non-agressive. Here is a picture in this thread of what the true RIR look like: https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/407294/the-heritage-rhode-island-red-site
     
  5. RedNewcomer

    RedNewcomer Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 17, 2014
    Marysville Ohio
    Thank you again. I have been picking my brain and looking all over for remedies and causes to the issue and you have completed all that. I'll be sure to contact you first.
     

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