Preparing for lambs! Any suggestions?

kaythlin

Chirping
Oct 28, 2017
69
70
91
Hello!
So my 1 1/2 y/o sheep is pregnant and I’m so happy !
She’s the first sheep I ever got, even before all the goats and the ram...
Anyways we found out she was pregnant maybe 1.. month ago? And we haven’t gotten a pregnancy test but you could telll
We believe she got bred maybe late November but my mom claims it was October. Anyways her udder is a little full and she waddles when she walks is so funny!
We think she has 1-2 months left but could be less since she’s big.
Any suggestions on how to deliver baby lambs?
What do I need ?
And other stuff like that
I just want to be prepared with all the info,
 

ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
9 Years
Nov 23, 2010
29,359
19,040
867
St. Louis, MO
I'm probably going to disagree with most others but I'm an old timer farmer.
IMO, you shouldn't have to do anything.
Sheep have been lambing for hundreds of thousands of years with no human intervention.
It sounds to me like lambing is imminent.
About all you have to do is observe. If it takes too long, you may want to get help if you have no experience with ungulates.
It reminds me of people helping eggs hatch. They shouldn't be helped.
I understand that larger animals are more precious and that there is a stronger urge to help.
 
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ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
9 Years
Nov 23, 2010
29,359
19,040
867
St. Louis, MO
I don't think that is true! (Maybe I don't know what you mean though...) :old
By that I mean they are considered more as pets than livestock.
Pets tend to be more expensive to raise than livestock in my experience.
Also, a lot more money is lost if one loses a lamb, calf, kid or foal than if an egg fails to hatch.
 
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Freysnes

Chirping
Jan 18, 2020
42
110
53
Iceland
Hey there!:lol:

congratulations with your sheep!
Over here i usually get 200 + lambs every season. Most of our sheep start being in heat around november 25 and stop around january 10th. The first are usually born in 19th of april and the last around 25th of may. (Lottttss and lots of sleepless nights :wee)

For me personally, i like to have birth lubricant, gloves, running water and "lambboost" (i dont know if you guys have it over there but it does wonders for the tiny lambs immune system!)
Most of the sheep give birth no problem, we let our ewes have their first when they are about 8 months old(they give birth around 1 year old) , that can be tricky and the horns can get in the way since the ewes arent large.
What about the ram you used? Does he have big horns? Is he measured and judged? Did you do an ultrasound to check how many she has?
On what kind of feeding system has she been on? We usually feed extra well during breeding season and the start of the pregnancy, then kind of mehh quality hey until they start giving birth to keep the lambs from getting way to big. They also get selen for their fertility and alot of protein (it being the best for them) as well as alot of other vitamins.

Like i said, most of the times they can do it all by themselves, sheeps arent like horses, they dont really need to rush it. it can even take some hours and be all okay!
Just make sure to try to track when she births and then try to be present alot, its always the safest option to keep an eye on them. If there are two of them, make sure they dont come out at the same time, that can be a pain!
be careful though if you wait to long IF the lamb is stuck, she could close up again and then you have to use the lubricant!

Alriiiiight so! :yesss:
Keep me updated! :D
 
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Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
10,967
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Catalonia, Spain
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There are really only two things you need to watch out for that you can do much about; make sure the lamb is able to breathe; that is there is no mucus or membrane stuck over it's nose and make sure it latches on to the ewes nipples and that the ewe delivers milk.
It's the first few milk deliveries by the ewe that contain colostrum which is vital for the lambs health.
 

Freysnes

Chirping
Jan 18, 2020
42
110
53
Iceland
There are really only two things you need to watch out for that you can do much about; make sure the lamb is able to breathe; that is there is no mucus or membrane stuck over it's nose

Thats true! If it does swallow some of it, pick it up by its back legs and lightly tap its side, facing it down. I often reach into the back of their throats with my pinkie and pull the yuck out if its really stuck ! :wee
 

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