Processed for the 1st time

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by hangin'witthepeeps, Mar 15, 2011.

  1. hangin'witthepeeps

    hangin'witthepeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 1, 2009
    Colbert, GA
    I processed 2 20 week old roosters for the 1st time on Sunday. My husband "culled" the roosters, I plucked all the feathers, he cut the bottom opening and removed the insides. I washed them really good and removed some pin feathers. I put them in a big pot covered in salt water and I guess I need to know what next. I need to get some of the lungs out. I see them up there in the back ribs. Anyone have a suggestion other than taking my fingers and digging it out?

    Once I get the lungs out and cut them in pieces what do I need to do to freeze them for later use?

    Just some background info, my husband culled a rooster 2 years ago and it was awful. Nasty tasting tough bird. I really want these to turn out well. I made sure the oil gland was cut out of the tail this time. Any suggestions? One was a Ameraucana roo and the other was a Blue Rock roo. Nice sized birds probably about 3 to 4 pounds dressed weight.
     
  2. ARose4Heaven

    ARose4Heaven Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 16, 2009
    Flippin, AR
    Why are you soaking them in salt water? This is something I've never done.

    Once you have them cut up, just put them in ziplock freezer bags with as little air as possible, and toss em in the fridge freezer. It will freeze them faster than a chest or upright type freezer. You can move them later if need be.

    I personally, never open up the body cavity of the bird. So never have to deal with cleaning out the lungs. I just cut off the breast meat, legs and wings. But I suppose that if you want to save the gizzard or heart, then you need to open the bird.
     
  3. hangin'witthepeeps

    hangin'witthepeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Colbert, GA
    If you don't open the bottom how do you get the poop and guts out? I really have never cooked a bird with the internal organs still inside? Is that even safe?

    ETA: I'm soaking them because that's what I read to do on this site?
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2011
  4. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    She is soaking them in salt water in order to brine them which will improve taste and tenderness. If you don't use the backs of the chicken to cook or make stock with then there is no need to do extensive cleaning of the lung's, but if you do I use an old bent up fork and just scrape it out, it's pretty easy. Let the birds rest in the brine for 3 day's or just a couple of day's and then freeze them in the brine, and when you thaw it out it can still brine and age.

    AL
     
  5. ARose4Heaven

    ARose4Heaven Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 16, 2009
    Flippin, AR
    OK, I have learned something here! That's a good thing! Never heard of brining before, but sounds like a great thing for the old hens I will be culling later this fall! Thanks.

    As for not opening the body cavity... I don't use anything inside the birds skeleton anyway, so why keep it? I just cut off all the meat I want from the outside, and freeze the carcass to boil up for the dogs later. I live in the country, so having a chicken carcass in the yard isn't offensive to the neighbors.
     
  6. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    To limit the toughness... you need to rest the chicken in the refrigerator for 2-4 days for rigor mortis to pass. [​IMG] To check if it has, after 24 hours in the refrigerator... take a leg and move it back and forth, up and down, if stiff ... continue to rest. If limp , it is ready to cook. [​IMG] Also a 20 week old chicken needs to be cooked l o n g and s l o w [​IMG] or it will be tough. Enjoy ! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2011
  7. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    Think of this way................. when you buy a chicken from the grocery store and unwrap it, it is totally limp and limber, yours should also be the same way, that signifies tenderness. Brining also moves water through the muscle cell walls and makes it even more tender. Go to the freezer now and read on the chicken wrapping (whole roaster) where is say's it may contain up to 10% water and then look and see how much sodium it also has. see they brine them while they are in transit and while being refridgerated at the store before sale.

    AL
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2011
  8. Kim_NC

    Kim_NC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 27, 2009
    Mt Airy, NC
    I agree with brining. It always makes them better......especially the heritage (dual purpose) breeds. But we also brine our Cornish X.
     
  9. secuono

    secuono Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2010
    Virginia
    Does boiling the bones make them brittle like baking does?
    I give my dogs raw chicken after it's been cooled[they do not like fresh raw...weirdos!]. My big dog eats feathers too...
     

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