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Quail with no eyes

Discussion in 'Quail' started by scotter, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. scotter

    scotter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well I have been busy hatching chickens Quail and even have turkeys in the incubator. I currently have about 40 quail hatching and watched one hatch that does not have any eyes. There are depressions where they should be but no slits, no dark spots under the skin. the chick also has a beak deformity, the bottom half is slightly larger and is slightly cupped. other than that the bird is acting just like the rest of them.

    I haven't decided how to handle the situation and am considering the option to keep and care for it. I have cared for blind animals before and understand the extra time and attention needed. I have not cared for a blind bird though and was wondering if anyone else here has worked with a blind quail and if they might have any pointers. I haven't ruled out culling the little guy but am leaning towards keeping him.

    The real question is does anyone have personal experience with caring for blind quail?
     
  2. scotter

    scotter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here's a picture of the little guy. So far he seems to be doing well with the other chicks in the hatcher but I know he will soon need to eat and drink.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    I have never dealt with blind birds before but know a few people that have. You can set up a water fountain type waterer so the bird can follow the sound of the water and get a drink. And keep the food bowl in the exact same spot every day or sprinkle feed on the floor near the water. They have done with with these blind birds. But these birds need to be kept alone and can not compete with other birds. And at some point, the other chicks may feel he is a threat to their existence and attack him. Birds are very keen on knowing birds are ill or can attract predators. So don't leave him long in the brooder with the others.

    Quail need to eat and drink in 24 to 30 hours of hatching, unlike chickens that can go 3 days. So you might dip his beak and tap on the floor of the brooder to get him started eating. Maybe syringe feed him for now.

    Good luck with this baby! And keep us posted on how he is doing. [​IMG]
     
  4. LindsayB

    LindsayB Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know some people have raised blind chickens with success but honestly I would have to cull...having no eyes is big enough but a beak deformity just makes it even worse. He's going to have a really hard finding food AND trying to eat it. Plus the other quail would probably peck at it and it would struggle with the others. I could be wrong but that's just my opinion. You have to sit back and think, is it really going to have a good life like this? My guess is probably not. : ( sorry your stuck with this decision.

    I had a an egg in my first batch of quail that didn't hatch. I did the float test and determined it was dead. After opening it I found a dead chick identical to yours. Sometimes mother nature knows best...
     
  5. James the Bald

    James the Bald Chillin' With My Peeps

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    x2. I have one hen with a leg deformity that I allowed to survive being that she provides an egg every day (she belongs to my 7yo son) and has her own cage so she won't get beatup by her cagemates. But being blind is totally different.
    James
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2014
  6. GrandmaBird

    GrandmaBird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My two cents says cull him. poor thing.
     
  7. nayeli

    nayeli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is completely up to you. Me being me, I would feel sorry for him and probably attempt to care for him since he has overcome so much already (just by making it out of the shell). It will be extra work for you though and he will more likely than not need to be seperated for his own protection.
     
  8. scotter

    scotter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So far Magoo is doing well. He doesn't seem to know what it means to be blind. He walks and runs around bumping into things, pecks at the floor for food, drinks from the water dish, and cuddles with the other Quail. We will keep an eye on him and make sure he doesn't get bullied.

    Edit: I almost forgot, he is real easy to pick out in the bunch because he has his head tipped up slightly in the same manner that is common with many people who are blind.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2014
  9. nayeli

    nayeli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm glad he is doing well. Is he having a problem finding food or water?
     
  10. scotter

    scotter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Water is no problem. He figured it out all by himself. Food is hit and miss but we have left plenty laying around. He is very quick. Most people looking in on him would probably not notice his blindness at this point. It hasn't been 24 hrs. yet but I am very hopeful. He seems to be doing well and other than some initial hand feeding we haven't treated him any differently than the others.
     

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