question about Campbells

cottagechick

Songster
8 Years
Jul 11, 2011
594
6
123
Cottage Grove, Oregon
I just saw this statement,

"mpbells are prolific layers and active foragers. Most Campbells lay their first eggs when 5-7 months old and will average 250-340 eggs of superb texture and flavor per year. With an age staggered flock, one may have eggs year-round."

On http://albc-usa.org/cpl/waterfowl/campbell.html

Am
I to take this to mean that if I got a duck say in January and then one in June that one would be laying when the other stopped? Are they not dependent on the season/light like chickens?
 

Nava

I Got The Naked Neck Blues
10 Years
Aug 2, 2009
7,167
116
291
Ocala Fl
I don't know much about them but I do know that I can always count on eggs from them.

and yes it makes sense since I had them in different ages
 

ke5hde

Songster
8 Years
Aug 29, 2011
734
77
158
Lafayette,NY
We only have 1 khaki and she just keeps chugging along, rarely misses a day. temp was only 6* in the coop a couple days ago and still had an egg in there.

Not really sure about the light since ours have always lived with chickens.
 
Last edited:

animalsRawesome

Songster
8 Years
Apr 12, 2011
887
11
146
In my experience, (which isn't much lol), the first year that they start laying they generally will lay at the 5-6 month mark regardless of lighting. The following year, though, I think they slow down much more when the hours of daylight start decreasing. IDK if that made any sense at all. I'm shutting up now
 

m.kitchengirl

Songster
8 Years
Jun 4, 2011
999
27
123
Maine
I know a lot of folks do a staggered flock with chickens for that reason - get a few new every spring so you always have the good, consistent "pullet year" layers. That is what I plan to do. I don't see why ducks would be any different than chickens.
 

cottagechick

Songster
8 Years
Jul 11, 2011
594
6
123
Cottage Grove, Oregon
m.kitchengirl :

I know a lot of folks do a staggered flock with chickens for that reason - get a few new every spring so you always have the good, consistent "pullet year" layers. That is what I plan to do. I don't see why ducks would be any different than chickens.

That would have made sense to me...and maybe I was reading it wrong...but it didn't sound like that's what they meant to me.​
 

DUCKGIRL89

Songster
8 Years
Apr 28, 2011
7,176
24
241
TN
Quote:If you want a OK layer, and a meat bird go with orpington ducks. They are fantastic layers and good meat birds
 

jackson41

Songster
9 Years
Jan 25, 2010
291
60
151
Wisconsin
Quote:If you want a OK layer, and a meat bird go with orpington ducks. They are fantastic layers and good meat birds


Never heard of an orpington duck! I just started researching will have to look them up. Thanks for the info.
 
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