Question about heat lamps

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Kristin228, Mar 14, 2017.

  1. Kristin228

    Kristin228 Out Of The Brooder

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    I am getting chicks very soon and they will be in a Rubbermaid brooder(I'll have hardware cloth over the top). They will be in my basement in the laundry room. It's a lil chilly in there and idk how high the wattage of the heat lamp I get should be. As the chicks grow older, do I move the heat lamp further away or...? I'm guessing I need a thermometer to regulate the temperature in the brooder so do I get that at Tractor Supply? The chicks I'm getting will be anywhere from a day to a week old not quite sure yet. Anyways, please help I'd love to hear what you guys have to say!
     
  2. zephyricle

    zephyricle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    "The temperature should be 90-95 degrees for the first week in the warmest part of the brooder and should be reduced by around 5 degrees each week thereafter, until the chicks have their feathers (5-8 weeks old)."

    When using a heat lamp, I have a thermometer in with them so I can check on them when I need to. When you want to decrease the temp. Just raise the lamp just like you thought. You can use ANY thermometer as long as you can read it and it isn't a cheap break easy one.

    You can probably find the heat lamps at tractor supply (I don't go there often since I have a local feed store for that... and I work at one haha)
     
  3. Kristin228

    Kristin228 Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay omg thank you so much[​IMG] Would 150 watts be too much or too little?
     
  4. zephyricle

    zephyricle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mm well what I've seen even 100 watt is fine but usually you can get heat lamp bulbs that work really well. It really just matters how close the bulb is to the chicks. I'll say 150 should be fine as long as you have a way of adjusting the height of the light
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2017
  5. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Be very careful with heat lamps when using storage tubs for brooders. That plastic tends to absorb and hold on to that heat, creating an oven effect. The brooder needs to be large enough to give chicks enough space away from the heat lamp to cool down. When it comes to heat, chicks need both a warm zone and a cool zone. The cool zone should be about 20 degrees cool than the warm zone.
     
  6. Kristin228

    Kristin228 Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay awesome thanks!
     
  7. Kristin228

    Kristin228 Out Of The Brooder

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    Ahhhhh I see that definitely makes sense! Thank you for the advice!
     
  8. MigraineMan

    MigraineMan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The only heat lamps available to us locally were 250W. The fixture we're using is only rated for 150W - check the label on the socket or inside the reflector. I put an in-line lamp dimmer on the heater, and set it to about 50%. Temperature directly below the lamp is 87F. The chicks clump in the middle of the tub, which tends to indicate we're in the right temperature zone.

    Our kids are excited about the chicks, and have a habit of bumping the tub when "helping." I put a piece of sheet metal on the tub to prevent it from melting should the lamp get bumped into contact. I also put a simple safety cable on the lamp so the hot-thing can't fall into the box of flammable stuff.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Welcome to BYC. Kristin, you can save yourself a lot of money and head ache by brooding your chicks with a heating pad. Initially there might be a little more expense, but it is MUCH safer, provides a much more natural experience for the chicks, and in the long run will save you some money based on electricity costs. HP raised chicks feather faster, are more socially adjusted, and overall are more content than heat lamp raised chicks. Check out these links:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/yes-you-certainly-can-brood-chicks-outdoors

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/956958/mama-heating-pad-in-the-brooder-picture-heavy-update
     

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