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Question about Pine Shavings

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by nicolets, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. nicolets

    nicolets Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm trying to set out a startup/two-month budget here, so thank you in advance for an answer. How long will a bag of 5.5 cu. ft. of fine pine shavings last for 8 chicks? Also, I'd just like to be sure that that kind of shavings is recommended rather than these (as they're a better deal).
    [​IMG]
    While I'm at it - is it true that a plastic bin is not a good idea to use as a brooder? [​IMG] It's supposed to cause respiratory problems, but I'd like to verify as, quite honestly, a plastic bin seems like a much better option than a cardboard box, and it's more convenient than a metal tub.
     
  2. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    I've used a plastic bin, for the same reason a glass aquarium is bad, the ammonia in the feces is heaver then air, if you are good at cleaning it out you should be ok.

    Aspen is better then pine as pine oil can cause respiratory issues according to some.
     
  3. nicolets

    nicolets Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hmm, I thought that was cedar. Thanks, though. Anyone else have two cents to put in?
     
  4. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    Oh, you might be right-

    I think I got them confused before- pine is bad for rabbits and rodents (pet and otherwise)

    Now I'm confused, I only use aspen because of this...
     
  5. clucknpeck

    clucknpeck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I read ceder is bad for respitory, pine is fine. That's what I am using.
    I asked for ceder shaving at the feed store and they gave me a huge packed bale, like the size you buy for filling horse stalls. It only cost $8 and it's going to last me most if not all the brooder time I think,
    I also am using a 40 gallon plastic storage bin. It's working great... I didn't read anywhere it could harm the chicks.
     
  6. clucknpeck

    clucknpeck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry, I asked for pine shavings, not ceder. Ceder is bad.
     
  7. nicolets

    nicolets Chillin' With My Peeps

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    MyPetChicken recommends pine, but I've read elsewhere about guinea pigs that aspen is a preferred type, so yes, that may be it. [​IMG]
     
  8. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer

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    Chicks do fine in a plastic bin. Just make sure there is plenty of room, good air circulation, and keep the area clean. I used paper towels over paper.
    [​IMG]

    I don't like to use any shavings at this age to prevent the chicks from accidentally ingesting a tiny piece of wood, and there is no wood dust to cake on their eyes or bottom area. Also, they had no trouble finding the food at their feet when using paper towels. This is my personal preference as my lungs don't appreciate any kind of dust. Many people use pine shavings with no problem. But please remember to remove old shavings every two days if chicks are kept in a small area. Avoid cedar shavings at all cost. While we find the cedar aroma attractive, the fumes are too much for tiny lungs.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. nicolets

    nicolets Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, everyone! [​IMG]
     

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