Question about processing

Noellereagan

Songster
Jun 20, 2018
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Big Bend, Wisconsin
For those that send their turkeys to freezer camp.. how do you process them?
Cone & Knife?
Axe?
Something else?

Mine are pets. But am curious what is considered humane/instantaneous.
I had to look at this because I recognized your screen name and know how you love your turkeys. I’ve been following the thread with your poults hatching. I was shocked to see this because I thought yours were pets. Now it makes sense. Normally I stay far away from threads like this. I find it bothersome to say the least. Obviously mine are pets too. I’m just curious, and don’t feel obligated to answer, but why are you asking this question?
 

R2elk

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For those that send their turkeys to freezer camp.. how do you process them?
Cone & Knife?
Axe?
Something else?

Mine are pets. But am curious what is considered humane/instantaneous.
I shoot mine in the back of the head with a .22 revolver and then use a hatchet to remove the head. I never send any to freezer camp as I like fresh better than frozen but they do get aged for 3 days in the refrigerator.
 
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Crazydoglady99

Crowing
Nov 6, 2018
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Oh hi Noelle! well as you know I had to assist one over the bridge yesterday. I was feeling very ill about it all, but didn't want it to suffer any longer.

Anyway, it got me thinking.. wondering what is considered the most humane/instantaneous method of dispatch, should anything happen in future.
 

Noellereagan

Songster
Jun 20, 2018
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Big Bend, Wisconsin
I shoot mine in the back of the head with a .22 revolver and then use an axe to remove the head. I never send any to freezer camp as I like fresh better than frozen but they do get aged for 3 days in the refrigerator.
A .22 does the job instantly always? I suppose the head is small and it’s point blank I assume. My boyfriend had to shoot an injured raccoon tonight- I think he had a 9mm out there and it came at him after the first shot and he had to unload two more rounds and that mean old thing made it across the road before it died.
Oh hi Noelle! well as you know I had to assist one over the bridge yesterday. I was feeling very ill about it all, but didn't want it to suffer any longer.

Anyway, it got me thinking.. wondering what is considered the most humane/instantaneous method of dispatch, should anything happen in future.
gotcha! Makes much more sense now! I feel better. I can’t be the only crazy turkey lady who keeps them as pets. You are my sister in arms... rrrr.... feathers :celebrateanyway, I did not know that. I’m so sorry. That really sucks. But if they were suffering you did a selfLESS and loving- and I’m sure very hard thing. Hugs your way. And you’re right- it’s a good thing to know. I should know too. As poultry owners, surely they’ll come a time... sigh.
 

R2elk

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A .22 does the job instantly always? I suppose the head is small and it’s point blank I assume. My boyfriend had to shoot an injured raccoon tonight- I think he had a 9mm out there and it came at him after the first shot and he had to unload two more rounds and that mean old th
The key is bullet placement. I shoot raccoons with a .22 without any problems. A 9mm if the shot is placed correctly should cause instant death to a raccoon.
 

Crazydoglady99

Crowing
Nov 6, 2018
621
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Its tricky hey Noelle.

I respect others wishes to raise & eat their own animals for food. The unfortunate reality is that compared to commercially raised 'meat/poultry etc', own raised animals live a far better life, and are hopefully dispatched quickly so as to not suffer. There's no question from a health perspective, home raised meats would be superior.

I couldn't do it personally, we only eat wild caught meat (and hopefully single shot = dead).
 

sfgwife

Crowing
May 19, 2017
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North Cakalaki
I shoot mine in the back of the head with a .22 revolver and then use an axe to remove the head. I never send any to freezer camp as I like fresh better than frozen but they do get aged for 3 days in the refrigerator.


I am gonna jump in here.... when they are floppin round... do they not bruise up their wings this way? Or do you have them contained some way? I ask because we have done ours in and out of bags, hangin like you would a rabbit but every time we do them out of a feed sack the wings are so bruised from hittin somethin. He was actually thinkin bout doin it like you do with one of the toms this year but was afraid it would flop and bruise like it has the other ways.
 

rjohns39

Wrangler
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Aug 20, 2015
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I use a cone and a very sharp knife. The key is to be calm and take your time. Once the bird is in the cone, I'll extend the neck and rub the feathers out of the way with the back of my knife. The bird will actually fall asleep in the cone most times. Then one very deliberate, deep cut. When I do it right the bird never wakes up.

ETA: I also wear a no-cut glove on my left hand.
 

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