Question on Cuckoo Marans

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by lilshadow, Mar 26, 2009.

  1. lilshadow

    lilshadow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 8, 2008
    Milaca, MN
    I am not sure if this is in the right place, but here goes. I just hatched out some cuckoo marans this morning, two of the have white spots on there heads, and some don't. Are they the same as barred rock in that the males have white spots on there heads and females don't? Do cuckoo marans even have spots on their heads when hatched?
     
  2. newnanchic

    newnanchic Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 3, 2008
    Newnan, Georgia
    Yes they do have white spots on their heads when they are hatched out. I don't know about the male / female part of the question. I know my roos are a lighter colores as they get older .
     
  3. klf73

    klf73 Mad Scientist

    Jun 1, 2008
    Maine
    all of my cuckoo marans had spots when they hatched. The smaller, more defined spots were the pullets and the bigger smudgey spots were cockerals. Not sure why you have some without spots [​IMG]
     
  4. Crunchie

    Crunchie Brook Valley Farm

    Mar 1, 2007
    Maryland
    Quote:Yeah that. Post pics and we can tell you who is who. Is there a chance you got another kind of breed or variety of Marans in w/your Cuckoo eggs? In Cuckoos, the females wil be a dark, charcoal grey/black color (w/yellow or white underfluff) and the boys will be a silvery grey (with yellow or white underfluff). Sometimes you have a dark-ish roo or a lighter pullet that fools you for awhile, but you can generally tell sex pretty accurately.
     
  5. CityClucks

    CityClucks The Center of a 50 Mile Radius

    Jan 31, 2009
    Tulsa, OK
    Quote:Barred Rocks all have spots on their heads as baby peeps - males and females. I think you mean Black Sex Links as the ones that can be sexed by whether or not they have the spot on their heads - the male BSL has the spot, the females are all black.
     
  6. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Tempe, Arizona
    The spot looks different if the chick has one versus two copies of the barring gene. Females can only have one; males usually have two, but can have only one, in which case their head spot will look like that of a female.
     
  7. FarmGirl01

    FarmGirl01 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2008
    AR
    I had the same question a few weeks ago. I found a thread that really helped me sex my chicks. The posters were Speckled hen and Cottage garden. Their "rules" for sexing barred chicks were dead on. They really helped me. I was able to sex the day olds very accurate. Good luck and let us know what you find out.
     
  8. sandypaws

    sandypaws Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 12, 2008
    desert of calif
    thanks for the info... i just had a bunch of cuckoo marans hatch too...
     
  9. lilshadow

    lilshadow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 8, 2008
    Milaca, MN
    Okay, going from what you guys have said it looks like I have two roo's because they are a silvery grey, and 5 pullets because they are charcoal grey/black. Here is the next question. I have read that cuckoo's have white lets, but some of them have all dark legs, and some have white, then some have a mixture of the two colors. So what gives with the leg coloring?
     
  10. lisahaschickens

    lisahaschickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 25, 2009
    Vancouver, WA
    I am raising my first Cuckoo MArans as well. Leg color is supposed to be white, but some breeders desire a dark color mixed in with the white. So, white or white with some dark is acceptable, or so I've read. I have some of both. I have read the biggest fault with leg color is yellow legs, indicating a recent cross with Barred Rocks (which were used early in the development of the breed). I read a fantastic article on the breeding history of the breed, but now I can't find it. I'll post it if I come across it again.
     

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