Question on Hatch Door

lmdengler

Songster
Jun 2, 2017
238
155
121
Upstate New York
Do you think I should close up the hatch door during the winter time? I have 21 chickens in a large walk-in
B5833DF4-9E06-40E8-B917-2CF56C5694CE.jpeg
coop my husband built last winter. I made so many mistakes last year including shutting them all in because I thought they would be cold, heating the coop, hanging the water inside and ending up with a mess, and the list goes on. I am just wondering if I can leave the hatch door open or should I close it at night to conserve heat? To give you an idea of the size, here's a pic of it from last year when it was still in process.
 

RNPAULIE69

Songster
May 27, 2017
235
316
121
I block off the pen section directly across from my coop door with marine vinyl ( wind blows from north right through that panel) and I leave the door open at night..the ladies have the freedom to come out when they want and I can sleep in ..win win. Just make sure your pen is predator proof!
 

007Sean

Face it, Embrace it, Ace it, Replace it
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Oct 25, 2015
33,048
196,993
1,642
South Central Texas
If your run faces North I would wrap plastic sheeting around it to keep drafts off the birds but leave the coop door open but only if it were predator proof.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
96,744
130,762
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
I am just wondering if I can leave the hatch door open or should I close it at night to conserve heat?
'Holding heat' is moot if you have a well ventilated coop.
Closing pop door at night is more about predator deterrence, tho your run looks pretty secure, unless you get raging winds that may come in thru pop door.

Telling us more about how you might 'winterize' your run, how predator proof it is, and what kind of ventilation you have in your coop, might garner viable suggestions as to whether you could leave the pop door open 24/7.
 

GC-Raptor

Free Ranging
Jul 26, 2016
5,173
9,817
621
Connecticut, USA
I close the chicken door after sunset, but both coops have vents at floor and eaves. If you don't have vents low and high then moisture buildup will happen and frostbite below freezing. Not to mention ammonia.
I'm on my third winter without frostbite in my old coop and keeping an eye out on the new girls and new coop for moisture on the windows. 20181018_182955.jpg .
I keep feed and water on a heated base in both coops 24/7. GC
 
Last edited:

lmdengler

Songster
Jun 2, 2017
238
155
121
Upstate New York
I close the chicken door after sunset, but both coops have vents at floor and eaves. If you don't have vents low and high then moisture buildup will happen and frostbite below freezing. Not to mention ammonia.
I'm on my third winter without frostbite in my old coop and keeping an eye out on the new girls and new coop for moisture on the windows. View attachment 1593553 .
I keep feed and water on heated bases in both coops 24/7. GC
You have to keep the feed heated too?
 

lmdengler

Songster
Jun 2, 2017
238
155
121
Upstate New York
I close the chicken door after sunset, but both coops have vents at floor and eaves. If you don't have vents low and high then moisture buildup will happen and frostbite below freezing. Not to mention ammonia.
I'm on my third winter without frostbite in my old coop and keeping an eye out on the new girls and new coop for moisture on the windows. View attachment 1593553 .
I keep feed and water on heated bases in both coops 24/7. GC
The vents I have are all in the eves and peeks of the coop. There are none on the floor. I didn't know you needed them there.
 

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