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Questions about rotenone 1%

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sweetfamily, Mar 17, 2009.

  1. Sweetfamily

    Sweetfamily New Egg

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    Mar 17, 2009
    Hi, I posted this in the introduction area--I think it will do better here.

    I found this site because they have chicken lice--noticed while checking out our injured hen--and I treated with the rotenone 1% that the feed store gave me. Now I have seen that it can affect the chickens if it builds up in their system and I am concerned. They are acting fine right now, it's been 2 days since I dusted and they are already laying better. I had dusted them and have a thin layer in the coop under the new bedding and in each box. Do I sweep it out and apply something else? And how long do I keep from eating the eggs?

    I spoke to a pesticide center located on the bag of rotenone and he couldn't find info on the eggs because it's an off label use. How foolish was I--I just wanted to get those off of my poor hens as quick as possible.

    Thank you, Linda
     
  2. Renee

    Renee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2008
    CALIFORNIA
    Hi Linda,

    Not stupid. It's hard to find good advice on treating chickens.

    Rotenone only lasts about six days in a dry environment, and it is difficult for humans to absorb into their intestinal tract. It's really dangerous to fish, but I don't think it will hurt your chickens too much, at least not as much as some of the other stuff out there. If you grow organic foods the govt. allows you to use rotenone and not disclose it.

    You can also use Sevin to treat lice, and permethrin (spelling?) in the coop. Sevin can be used on vegetables for human consumption, so it is relatively safe. None of these are perfectly safe, heck, they kill bugs, so caution should be exercised.

    I don't think you have to avoid eating the eggs, but since they are being laid in nest boxes that are dusted, you may want to wait a week and then clean out the next boxes.

    You should treat the chickens a second time to get rid of all of the lice.

    Welcome to BYC.
     
  3. Sweetfamily

    Sweetfamily New Egg

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    Mar 17, 2009
    Thank you for the info--I couldn't find it anywhere. I will treat them once more this weekend and clean out the coop as well. They seem happier because they are not itchy anymore. One of those nasty lice was crawling on me and I couldn't stand it--cant' imagine more than one!
    Linda
     
  4. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    I see a product called Dri-Kill twice a year or so as a preventive, contains rotenone and sulfur. I use it under the nests in the laying boxes, and it has widespread use with livestock for pest control. You could consider alternating with Sevin and food-grade DE, so that exposure to either mixture is minimized...I'd be more concerned about DDT and dieldrin. You certainly need something to protect the birds from lice and mites, which are debilitating.[​IMG]

    Here's an abstract worth checking-

    http://www.cababstractsplus.org/abstracts/Abstract.aspx?AcNo=19730505473
    (may be slow loading)

    And as part of your prevention program, spreading lines of food-grade diatomaceous earth around the coop perimeter, run perimeter and in all cracks and crevices can keep pest load wayyyyyyyyyyyyy down.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2009

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