Questions as I get closer to moving chickens into new coop

Cryss

Eggcentric
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Nov 12, 2017
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Some of you know I've been a long time building my 8x12 walk in coop. As it gets closer to being ready I've started my usual worrying.

So I have 2 windows each probably 2x2. One is north facing the other west facing. The human door has a window about 1x2 also west facing. So a total of about 10sqft of window. I do not use lights in winter. I will probably use a battery powered lantern for my own ability to see if needed. There is no outside light that will illuminate the coop at night. My silly question is can there ever be too much light coming in the windows?

Second question . When introducing new pullets, or when breaking a broody, or when letting a broody sit and hatch, is it a bad idea in any of those cases to have the dog cage (or maybe a small similar permanent area built in) inside the coop or is it better for there to be an area in the run? I've broken broodies in the run using a tarp at night and in rain.

I am trying to plan ahead.
 

PirateGirl

Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist
Mar 11, 2017
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I like the idea of having a space built into the interior of the coop. That way if you have a broody with little chicks they are protected from the elements, or if you are using it as a hospital box, again the bird is protected from inclement weather, etc. If you are introducing new pullets, it has the added bonus that you are training them that the coop is home and the safe spot.
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
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Jul 3, 2016
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Built-in inside the coop would be the better of the two IMO, for safety and for protection from weather. But having the option of both would be optimal. Admittedly I'm fine using an outdoor set up, as I figure the chickens spend most of their time in the run.

As far as light, I don't think you can ever have "too much" natural light (exception might be in very hot climates, where the sunlight coming in turns the coop into an easy bake oven - or if you have a rooster you don't want crowing at the crack of dawn). I have 39 sq ft of windows in a 60 sq ft coop.
 

Cryss

Eggcentric
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Nov 12, 2017
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I guess my thinking was that maybe it would be bad to keep them indoors while everyone else is out in the run.

My windows open by propping out at the bottom, hinged on top, hardware cloth covered. Door window slides down. Summers should be ok.

As usual I'm probably overthinking. I'm just so anxious for this coop to be finished.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
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Nov 27, 2012
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When introducing new pullets, or when breaking a broody, or when letting a broody sit and hatch, is it a bad idea in any of those cases to have the dog cage (or maybe a small similar permanent area built in) inside the coop or is it better for there to be an area in the run?
For new chicks(broodied, bought, or hatched) I like to have both coop space and run space separate but adjacent to main flocks space.
For breaking broodies I keep crate in coop, except that time it was so hot I had to bring crate out into run or yard to find shade so I didn't cook her.
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
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Southeast Louisiana
My silly question is can there ever be too much light coming in the windows?

I'm sure someone could devise a scenario where too much light might happen, maybe to do with the greenhouse effect, but you will be fine with your windows. You and the chickens should have enough light to do what they need to do in there. In Arkansas I had one window on the north side of my 8' x 12' coop. It let in plenty of light, so you have plenty, you should not need a lantern during the day. Others on the forum use a lot more glass and may even have a clear roof and they do OK.

When introducing new pullets, or when breaking a broody, or when letting a broody sit and hatch, is it a bad idea in any of those cases to have the dog cage (or maybe a small similar permanent area built in) inside the coop or is it better for there to be an area in the run?

My criteria for any of these is that they need to be predator safe and take into consideration the weather. For example, you don't want them to cook in the sun or for rain to get them wet. Also, they need to be able to see and be seen by the flock.

I have electricity so my brooder is in the coop. The brooder makes a great broody buster when it is empty. If it is not empty I hang a wire dog cage inside the coop. I do not consider my run predator safe. My broodies hatch in the coop with the flock having access, I do not isolate them. Some people have a broody hide a nest away from the flock and have no trouble integrating them when they show up with a bunch of chicks in tow.

Most of my broody hens sleep on the coop floor with their chicks, I generally don't isolate them. But if the coop is getting too crowded I have an outside predator-proof shelter inside electric netting where the broody and her chicks sleep at night. My grow-out coop is next tot he main run and the electric netting with its own run. They are in plain sight of the main run and netting.

I don't see a "better" between inside or outside as long as the basic criteria is met. If all else is equal, make it more convenient for you.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
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Nov 27, 2012
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I will probably use a battery powered lantern for my own ability to see if needed.
Get yourself a headlight...even sometimes during the day, with plenty of windows, I need it to see well in the coop. One of the best tools I ever bought, keeps both hands free while lighting what you need to see.
Get one that is hinged, so you can line up the light with your multi-focal lenses(if you wear them) :lol: .
 

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