Raccoon-proof latches?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Hennyetta, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. Hennyetta

    Hennyetta Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My husband is going to be building a coop for me, and I'm wondering about what kind of latches/fasteners for the doors/windows and such. I know raccoons are clever little critters, and obviously I don't want them to figure out how to get my coop open!

    Any thoughts?

    Also, is there any good way to keep mice out of the coop, and therefore out of the feed?
     
  2. moetrout

    moetrout Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use these with a cheap carabiner to keep it locked:

    [​IMG]
     
  3. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Most windows have a rotating clip that locks them from the inside. I use 2 latches on all my poultry and dog doors. One is a standard bolt lock that moves over (I put that down low). The other is the automatic latch the locks when you close the door. This one you add a wire that you pull from inside to open the latch (On mine I just cut a hole in the fence so that i can reach my hand through and flip the latch). Each are under 5 bucks and at a Lowes or Home Depot. Both can also have rope clip on them for added security. Of course you can also add a padlock instead of the clip to keep kids or people out. Our coop is within a goat pen and the goats can actually manipulate the rope clip off and open the latch with their teeth!
     
  4. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One tip about latches. I live up north and as the temperatures swing alot my gates and doors are in constant movement as the ground thaws and freezes. One day a latch will latch and the next it is 1/4" or 1/2" off. Pick latches that have some play in them. I often have to reset latches on my gates and doors in the Winter.
     
  5. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    My Coop
    We use a very simple design that is very inexpensive and effective...

    In this first pic notice the swivel that is screwed in behind the latch. The latch is in the open position...(this door is not attached to anything at the moment and the clasp that would be attached to the right is also not there. :)
    [​IMG]


    In this pic the latch is now shut and the swivel is turned down. The door is completely locked...
    [​IMG]


    In this pic, note the latch is open as far as it would open, say if a critter was trying to open it in the night. The swivel is tight to turn at all times...
    [​IMG]

    No animal will ever figure these things out. You can get these swivels at any hardware store for less than $2 bucks.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
    2 people like this.
  6. ReikiStar

    ReikiStar Chillin' With My Peeps

    We use slide bolts with the looped handle, not the small notched lever as illustrated above. Then we put a carabiner clip through it. Racoons are incredibly dexterous but they don't have the wherewithall to open a carabiner.
     
  7. Hennyetta

    Hennyetta Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the ideas, everyone! I like the idea of a carabiner, or the swivel pictured above. Just don't want any coons getting my chickens!
     
  8. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG] that is my yet to be mounted nesting box.
     
  9. JanetS

    JanetS Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
    This is what we use.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. MaddBaggins

    MaddBaggins Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Same here. I have 2 on the door to the run, 1 hi and 1 low. D ring for a lock.
     

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