Really need some help getting these turkeys into condition

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by PalmRoyal, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. PalmRoyal

    PalmRoyal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 28, 2013
    Lima, OH
    I just bought some turkeys that I slightly regret buying, but couldn't let them go home with the people that I bought them from. They said that they bought them from a good breeder and the whole story that they are very good turkeys. However, the turkeys' leg bands are metal and cutting into their legs. They are covered in mud. All of their feathers are broken. Then the one's head is bloodied and raw. Their eyes seem puffed up like they just came out of a dust storm. They are in a just overall bad shape.

    I was told that they are good show turkeys, despite the one hen being DQed for a beard at her last show. The one hen has very little black bands on her at all. Both hens also have a slight chocolate colored tint to them.

    I have another tom that I bought from a man that farmed them for their feathers and wasn't in the best condition when I got him (crooked breast bone and breast blisters), but now he is (as the judge that judged him said) fat but very happy and friendly.

    I was told to put pepper on the one hens head, but, instead, I put vaseline and then pepper on top of the vaseline. I know I need to give them a bath, that is something that needs done. I also need to get some Sevin on them as well, because I'm half scared that they have mites.

    I'm very concerned about these birds. What do I do to get them back on their feet and into show condition? I'm also concerned about the brown feathers and light blacking on the hens. I do not show except for 4-H, so these are mostly pets, but I still want them looking nice.
     
  2. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 16, 2012
    Texas
    This question could probably be answered better in the turkey section.

    But it sounds like the turkeys were kept in crowded and muddy conditions. Feed them well, give them plenty of room to move around, and make sure they have a dry area.

    Those would be my suggestions.
     

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