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red eyed Coturnix chick

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Monkau, Jul 19, 2015.

  1. HeritageGoose13

    HeritageGoose13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If I were you I would try it! You've discovered a brand new color of coturnix!
     
  2. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I really hate to be the jerk who bursts the bubble, but I had a conversation with another breeder about this today. When I told him about he red eyed bird he immediately asked if it was a cream colored bird from Australia. They've been turning up down there in that color for a while. It's just a form of albanism.
     
  3. GitaBooks

    GitaBooks Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Its cool that they are found in Australia, and that they were recreated.

    However, I have to disagree with it simply being a form of albinism, as officially albanism is a lack of all melanin, while these birds have some coloration. That means a different gene is behind it, probably a dilution, like lavender or lilac. Lutino cockatiels are not albinos, as they have yellow feathers and so don't lack all coloration. Red Albino cornsnakes are only lacking melanin and not the red pigment in their skin.

    If, however, you have proof otherwise, please tell me as I would be interested.
     
  4. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    There are many forms of albinism, not just the form relating to the pigmentation of skin. Humans for instance can have ocular albinism where only there eyes are the only thing affected. Leucism is also a from of albinism where pigment is only partially affected.

    Not to be nit picky but they weren't recreated, they've only been appearing there in recent years.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2015
  5. GitaBooks

    GitaBooks Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Not to argue ([​IMG]) but I have studied reptile genetics and in reptiles at least, leucism is not techinically a type of albisim, only a type of hypomelanisim.
     
  6. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Leucism aside albinism can still be divided into categories. Here is an article that discusses it, and below is an excerpt from the article.

    Types:
    • Complete Albinism (autosomal recessive; completely white bodies with bright red eyes)
    • Incomplete Albinism (sex-linked recessive; pink eyes with white to light yellow bodies, light barring may occur on some feathers)
    • Dominant White (incomplete autosomal dominant; white bird with black skin; partially lethal; few birds survive to adulthood)
    • Recessive White (autosomal recessive; white bird with a few WT feathers splashed on the head, neck, and back)
    • White Feathered Down (autosomal recessive; lethal in the homozygous form; white feathers and down and black eyes)
    • Brown Splashed White (autosomal recessive; white splashed with WT feathers predominantly on the head, back, wings, and breast)
    • Panda (autosomal recessive; WT splashed with white; breast feathers and primaries are always white)
    • White Breasted (autosomal recessive; white fronted birds-from eyes to vent)
    • White Crescent (possibly autosomal recessive; white crescent on the chest of a WT colored bird)
    • White Bib (possibly autosomal recessive; white bib on the chest of a WT colored bird)
    • White Primaries (autosomal recessive; white primary feathers only)

    Here is another article that discusses the divisions of albinism in animals.
    http://www.dvoc.org/CassiniaOnLine/Cassinia47/C47_02_21.pdf
     
  7. Monkau

    Monkau Out Of The Brooder

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    Theres no bubble burst, Albie is awesome and it's great that we have them :)
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Monkau

    Monkau Out Of The Brooder

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    Perth, Western Australia
    Some more recent pics

    [​IMG]
    Hatchmates


    [​IMG]
    Albie.

    [​IMG]
    One of the dark eyed hatchmates


    [​IMG]
    Albie.


    [​IMG]
    One of the bigger darker grey hatchmates
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2015
  9. HeritageGoose13

    HeritageGoose13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can be partially albino.
     
  10. GitaBooks

    GitaBooks Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Descriptions of coloration mutations:

    Albinism is a congenital disorder in people and a hereditary condition in animals characterized by the complete or partial absence of pigment in the skin, hair/feathers, and eyes due to absence or defect of tyrosinase, a copper-containing enzyme involved in the production of melanin. An animal wth complete absence of melanin is called an albino and those with diminished amounts are called leucistic or albinoid. Albinism os associated with a number of vision defects, makes for a susceptibility to sunburn and skin cancer, and in rare cases (in people) Chediak-Higashi syndrome. It also affects essential granules present in immune cells, leading to increased susceptibility to infection.

    Amelanisim is a pigmentation abnormality charcterized by the lack of pigments called melanins, commonly associated with genetic loss of tyrosinase function. It can affect fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals (including people). Lutino cockatiels are amelanistic

    Aeumelanism is a loss of MC1R function, a recessive trait, that has been observed in many species. In humans, resulting in red hair, blond hair and melanoma. Aeumelanic hair coats, associated with mutations of the MC1R gene, have also been identified in mice, cattle, dogs, and horses. These coat colors are called "yellow" in mice and dogs, "red" in cattle and chestnut in horses. The loss of eumelanin in the coat is, in these species, harmless.

    Aphaeomelanism is an abnormal absence of phaeomelanin from the integumentary system. Loss of function of agouti signalling protein can permit unmediated eumelanin production, producing a uniformly black-to-brown coat color. This condition can be observed in dogs, cats, and horses. The appearance of mammals with recessive agouti mutations is typically dense black. Some agouti alleles in mice are associated with health defects, but this is not the case in dogs, cats, or horses.

    Hypomelanism is a condition in which there is a partial lack of the melanin, thus, a reduced pigmentation. It is used to describe reptiles and amphibians. It means the melanin production is reduced, not necessarily absent.

    Leucism is a condition in which there is partial loss of pigmentation in an animal resulting in white, pale, or patchy coloration of the skin, hair, feathers, scales or cuticle, but not the eyes. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in multiple types of pigment, not just melanin. It includes white peacocks and white lions.

    Dilutes have melanocytes, but vary from darker colors due to the concentration or type of these pugment-producing cells, not their absence. Pigment dilution, sometimes referred to as hypomelanism, effects cremello horses and cats, as well as other animals.
     

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