regulating incubator temperature

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by smarsh, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. smarsh

    smarsh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    lexington, KY
    In my first effort at incubating I had maginal success. of 7 fertile eggs I hatched 3 chicks. The others had fully developed chicks that died before hatching. They hatched 1-1/2 days early which, by all accounts, meant my temperature was too high. I used a meat thermometer the first time around; it seemed to measure my temperature better than the indoor/outdoor one I had bought. I stuck it in a water filled/egg size container. the temperature stayed very steady at nearly a hundred, but appeared to be just shy. The moisture content of the eggs seemed okay; they may have been slightly drier than ideal. I tried to mantain the recommended humidity for the period and think I did okay. The chicks didn't drawn in the egg, it was likely a little too dry in the developed space. The only other factor I think should be considered was the circulation by the fan. I used the fan of choice, one removed from an old computer, but I had it wired to run all the time as opposed to only when the heat was on, and I thought it was a little strong. Oh yeah, and I had a shield between the bulb used for light source and the eggs so the heat didn't hit directly on them.

    Anyway, I read somewhere that medical thermometers don't work well for this. Can someone tell me what I might do different or how you manage your temperature?

    My 3 are healthy and strong at 11 weeks with the lone roo eyeing the ladies already.

    thanks, scott
     
  2. rebelcowboysnb

    rebelcowboysnb Confederate Money Farm

    Medical thermometers work great, been using them myself. The water filled cup dos not. It will show colder that actual temp because it is evaporating. Try a baby food jar. Put a hole threw the lid for the thermometer an seal it up with silicone or glue. You could also try grease or cooking oil. Something that does not evaporate off at 100*F.

    The fan also should run all the time. To much wind in never an issue.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2009
  3. panner123

    panner123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    Garden Valley, ca
    Get a digial thermometer from Wal-mart, they keep track of both the temp and humidity. Sounds like you are using a home made incubator.
    Which in some cases are better than store bought. Were the un-hatched chicks stuck to the shell? That would tell you if the humidity was to low. Some times stuff just happens. If you had all 7 eggs develope you were doing something right. If you can monitor both the temp and humidity at the same time, you have a better chance of telling what went wrong and why. I like to keep the humidity at about 30% for thew first 18 days, then kick it up to 60% until the hatch is over. With a fan most say to keep the temp at 99.5.
     
  4. smarsh2

    smarsh2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 1, 2009
    thank you for your input, i appreciate it and believe i will be more successful next time around.
    scott
     

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