Rehabilitating a Rooster

dawg53

Humble
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11 Years
Nov 27, 2008
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Glen St Mary, Florida
Nope. Not cost effective nor timely enough for my needs. I own the machinery that created the bird im trying to save. It's cheaper to make another one or perhaps a better one from that machine or save it with coventional or unconventional meds. I have absolutely no emotional attachment to any of my stock. If i keep my breeding stock for more than 2 seasons I'm either stagnant or moving into the past.

I worm with ivermectin every 90 days. Cheapest feed i can buy. I have yet to have any signs of internal parasite load. I vary the concentration by the time of the season. Summer dosage level when the are drinking gallons/day is ineffective winter dosage when they are drinking gallons per week. I'm always willing to learn so if you have research based info substantiating that ivermectim doesnt work it would probably benefit the entire forum by posting it and making it a sticky.

When handling a 12lb heritage cornish rooster it easier to give them an injection then restrain and open their mouth with one hand and dispense an oral solution and avoiding having liquid aspirated.
I used to use ivermectin and eprinex long ago and found both ineffective in treating large roundworms. Some types of poultry mites are showing resistance to ivermectin as well. I suspect resistance due to overuse as a miteacide in poultry.
I switched to benzimidazoles and pyrantel pamoate and havnt looked back since.
 
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Fairview01

Songster
Jan 26, 2017
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Dallas, TX
How does one judge how much to give a chicken when this drug is not approved or given often to poultry? I am just making a point that denagard, tylan, and tetracyclines including doxy, are much better choices to use. The biggest reason we choose amprollium as a first drug for cococidiosis nowadays, is that sulfonamides (Sulmet, Sulfadimethoxine) which used fo be the first choice, are toxic and can damage hearing and kidneys.
Like any other non approved med for poultry. Trial and error. Thats how i came up with 0.2ml every other day. That and see the screen shot attached. Additionally since chickens are capable of cochlear hair regeneration when damaged from ototoxins or loud noises any gentamicin damage to chicken hearing is temporary at worse.

@ColtHandorf, if he were mine I would give him Baytril. Do you have any Baytril?
I would only use gentamycin as a very last resort.
Baytril comes with an explicit warning not to be used for livestock animals yet you encourage the OP to use it without any caveat. Baytril has been documented to produce antibiotic resistant microbes capable of infecting humans. Baytril is the first animal only non human use antibiotic that has been pulled by the FDA from livestock use and restricted to use in non livestock animals namely dogs anf cats.

I suggested the use a baytril several posts back but i also included the warning that it is not approved for edible animals.

The use of baytril with the current FDA restrictions doesnt even qualify it for off label use. Gentamicin does not come with those restrictions and is routinely used in commercial poultry operations and even comes with a withdrawal time prior to slaughter. See pic.

Try to find that for baytril.

Both of you are very knowledgeable about poultry but sometimes you need to do your research better.
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casportpony

🦆🦚Enlightened🦚🦆
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Baytril comes with an explicit warning not to be used for livestock animals yet you encourage the OP to use it without any caveat
You are mistaken, it is labeled and approved for use in cattle and swine, look it up. And I almost always post a disclaimer about it being banned for use in poultry.
Baytril is the first animal only non human use antibiotic that has been pulled by the FDA from livestock use and restricted to use in non livestock animals namely dogs anf cats.
Wrong! it *is* approved for cattle and swine.
https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=30e079f2-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5
entamicin does not come with those restrictions and is routinely used in commercial poultry operations and even comes with a withdrawal time prior to slaughter. See pic.



Screenshot_20200221-214027_Chrome.jpg
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That's from poultrydvm which is *not* a reliable source and is *full* of misinformation.
Both of you are very knowledgeable about poultry but sometimes you need to do your research better.
I think you might want to too.
 

ColtHandorf

Crowing
Feb 19, 2019
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Commerce, Texas
I’m in the car (not driving) back from TSC where I got the LA-200. Do I have to administer it subcutaneously? Or is there another method?

Apparently this didn’t post, so he’s now had a bath and I’m blow drying him before bed.
 

Eggcessive

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Apr 3, 2011
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Many people have been giving it orally off-label, it seems with good results. It is basically a cattle medicine, so using it in chickens by intramuscular injection or oral use is off-label. This is done more since antibiotics are no longer available in feed stores because people have over-used them, and injectable antibiotics may be their only answer if vet care is not available. Antibiotics do not help with viruses.
 

ColtHandorf

Crowing
Feb 19, 2019
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Commerce, Texas
Well I've been giving it to him once a day by mouth. He started crowing at 2 AM on Sunday morning. So I assumed he felt better. He's also gotten another bath and a serious butt fluff trim. I can't handle the poos. He's still not standing, or walking much, but I've read/learned that's a symptom of MG? Which is a bit odd considering it's an upper respiratory infection. But I'll take that over Marek's Disease any day of the week.
 
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