Removing Broken/Damaged Feather

EmilyRobb

Songster
Premium Feather Member
May 12, 2020
118
252
121
Southwestern Manitoba
I'm not sure if I'm really posting this question in the right area of BYC, but I'll ask away anyways and if there is a more appropriate place then please let me know.

I've heard from a few people that if their birds have a broken or damaged feather, they'll remove the whole thing, usually by just plucking, and a new feather will begin to grow in at some point. This seems to be utilized more in exhibition birds because they don't want to wait for a molt for feathers to be replaced. Is the plucking of "unappealing" feathers ok to do if you want to expedite the formation of a new and undamaged feather??
 

nchls school

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 22, 2015
6,884
3,612
386
Tennessee
I'm not sure if I'm really posting this question in the right area of BYC, but I'll ask away anyways and if there is a more appropriate place then please let me know. While not an emergency in your case it could be in someone else's situation so I think you posted in the right forum.

I've heard from a few people that if their birds have a broken or damaged feather, they'll remove the whole thing, usually by just plucking, and a new feather will begin to grow in at some point. This seems to be utilized more in exhibition birds because they don't want to wait for a molt for feathers to be replaced. Is the plucking of "unappealing" feathers ok to do if you want to expedite the formation of a new and undamaged feather??
I raise Serama, Yokohama, and Phoenix bantams to sell. As such it is important that they look their best. When feathers get damaged to the point of ruining a beautiful bird's looks I pluck. This does cause pain just as someone grabbing several hairs on your head and yanking them out would be painful. That pain is short-lived. New feathers start growing quickly and the pulled feather is replaced in 3-5 weeks.

When plucking pull straight out from the body, hard, and quick. A quick yank causes less pain than slowly pulling the feather.
 

EmilyRobb

Songster
Premium Feather Member
May 12, 2020
118
252
121
Southwestern Manitoba
@nchls school do different breeds grow back their feathers at different rates that you know of? I raise cochins and ayam cemanis and I'm thinking of plucking a few unappealing feathers as I plan to show and sell the birds from late summer towards the end of the calender year. Any guesses on how long feathers will take to grow, from plucking to full feather maturity?
 

nchls school

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 22, 2015
6,884
3,612
386
Tennessee
@nchls school do different breeds grow back their feathers at different rates that you know of? I raise cochins and ayam cemanis and I'm thinking of plucking a few unappealing feathers as I plan to show and sell the birds from late summer towards the end of the calender year. Any guesses on how long feathers will take to grow, from plucking to full feather maturity?
I am sure that the health of the bird has more to do with how fast a feather is replaced than breed. With a healthy bird on a good diet a plucked flight feather is replaced in 3 to 4 weeks. Tail feathers probably would take longer. Small contour body feathers would be replaced in less time. I think plucking should only be done only when necessary. If a feather follicle is damaged the feather may not be replaced at all.
 

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