Results from First Year with Deep Litter Method

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Daisy8s, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Northwest Arkansas
    For mine I just cut a hole out between studs, framed top and bottom with 2x4’s like you would for a window or door, and covered that opening with hardware cloth. Lots of different ways work.
     
  2. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I did the same thing on my last coop...just cut out a hole, covered with wire, put a cloth flap on it so the wind didn't go directly into the coop but still could seep it's way in just fine.
     
  3. dhining

    dhining Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi Hokum., you wrote something that piqued my interest . Do hens sometimes lay hens "by accident" during the night? My roosting poles are 2 and 3 feet above the floor. Is this something I should prepare for? Thanks, Deborah
     
  4. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Not the addressee, but will answer the question. Yes, on occasion an egg is laid from the roost...some of which are shell-less eggs. Deep litter will keep those from breaking. I always have roosts around 4 ft. on up and have never had an egg break from the roost since using deep litter.
     
  5. dhining

    dhining Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 27, 2013
    Thank you!
     
  6. beverly evans

    beverly evans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2013
    And here I am throwing scratch and scraps only on the cleanest hard packed ground so that my chicks won't miss a speck of their goodies and not be accidently eating any poop! Who knew? I get a lot of moisture around the edges after a rain and hope by deep litering with peat moss I can avoid disaster from dampness. I'll put some lime powder down first, maybe that will help.
     
  7. beverly evans

    beverly evans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2013
    I don't understand how you can manage 24" ? I have a walk-in coop and could not navigate in 24 inches of shavings and poop! My chickens would be under it! Really, do they walk on top of all that! Someone called it "fluffy" which sounds like they would be swimming in it?? Or if it packs down that defeats the purpose. ???
     
  8. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I get moisture around the edges in a rain also but have learned to leave it alone. I've found that the middle of my coop gets too dry and in a rain that doesn't change...but the outside edges get a good bit of moisture. If I leave it, the bugs seem to migrate there and the worms come up into the bedding there. Within a couple of days of rain, the chickens are digging out the edges and corners of my coop after those insects and worms, throwing the wet bedding to the middle of the coop...leaving the edges and corners open to the air and they dry off. Meanwhile, the moisture deposited into the middle of the coop is being wicked into the bottom of the dry litter, which must then attract more bugs because a few days later the chickens go after the bugs there, tossing the litter back to the edges and corners of the coop. The litter has then been effectively dried out sufficiently but moisture has been distributed evenly...it's perfect!

    Before I learned that, I was placing dry litter from the middle of the coop over the wet litter at the edges to absorb the moisture...only to find the birds had flung it all out in search of bugs under that wet litter, destroying all my work. So, now I leave the DL alone except to very lightly throw a little dry litter on top of feces under the roosts....and when I look under that a few days later, the poop has disappeared....the bugs will come up and get it quicker if they can hide while doing so. Much like when you feed earthworms...they will eat scraps quicker if you just place them under the top layer of soil so they won't have to be exposed to eat them.
     
  9. beverly evans

    beverly evans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2013
    Hi, Like you I had a barren backyard that over the years the dogs had killed all the grass and the huge Hackberry that had shaded the whole yard had fallen over and died. (The neighbors, not wanting baby hackberrys popping up in their yard, had cut all that grew over their yard off, and being lopsided, after a few good rains it gave way.) Suddenly it became important to have trees, bushes and edible plants for the chickens! They must be able to hide from hawks all year long and have things to eat from the yard. So I have planted all kinds of plants and vines, but only now am going to get trees. I am 72 so have to think of fast growing trees and very drought tolerant ones as well since they take our watering privileges away in the summer's hottest months. I used to at least mow the weeds and it looked okay after, but now I have these strange little holes all over the yard such that my yard kinda looks like the surface of the moon, you know, all pock-marked? I made them the loveliest spot to dust bathe. but would they use it? He-- no! Good luck on your yard. I really have to get busy on mine if I want to enter our meet ups funky coop tour in the spring. : )
     
  10. beverly evans

    beverly evans Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2013
    THX Bee, how's your weather? First day this season I have to put on a jacket to stay outside. My cx don't do much scratching in the coop, mostly outside. I have feed inside up on round pavers so they don't get so much trash in it. If I deep littered anything like what she does the feed would be covered in shavings and poop! : (
     

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