1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Rooster and hens behavior question here!!!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by GretaGarboFirst, Sep 24, 2014.

  1. GretaGarboFirst

    GretaGarboFirst Chillin' With My Peeps

    79
    15
    76
    Sep 29, 2013
    Massachusetts
    My one rooster and 5 hens are 15 wks old and live together in a large coop and attached pen. My rooster gets up first and the first hen to exit into the pen gets picked on by him. Now all the hens seem to stay on the roost for a good long time in the morning!!!No on seems to want to deal with "boss" in the morning because he bullys them by chasing and grabbing at their feathers.

    Is this normal? Any suggestions to make a better morning for my little hens? He jumps down and exits when I open the door to the coop. At that time I put food in the pen and one scoop inside the coop. The girls keep sitting. He doesn't appear hungry just nasty in the A.M.

    Thank you for any input.
     
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

    16,482
    4,486
    481
    Mar 9, 2014
    Oregon
    My Coop
    Young cockerels tend to start feeling the hormonal urges at a younger age than young pullets start to reach sexual maturity -- this can lead to the scenario you are seeing. Your cockerel is starting to practice sexual advances and, since the pullets are not yet ready to accept them, it tends to be a very unromantic event between them. The chasing and grabbing is part of his early attempts at mating behaviors. Unless you are seeing actual serious injury/damage, there isn't anything to *worry* about.
     
  3. GretaGarboFirst

    GretaGarboFirst Chillin' With My Peeps

    79
    15
    76
    Sep 29, 2013
    Massachusetts
    Thank you. That certainly makes lots of sense.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2014
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

    7,251
    1,547
    356
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    Cockrels in a flock of various aged birds tend to learn about polite behavior from the older hens, but in your group that's not happening. In future years your young guys will get attitude adjustment therapy from the older ladies, and things will probably go better. Mary
     
  5. GretaGarboFirst

    GretaGarboFirst Chillin' With My Peeps

    79
    15
    76
    Sep 29, 2013
    Massachusetts
    Thanks so much. An attitude adjustment would be nice. Today I notices one hen was telling him off a bit. He's a good guy and he better stay that way!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by