Rooster Help!

barberfamducks

In the Brooder
5 Years
May 25, 2014
43
0
22
Colorado
My family and I (more I than my family) are interested in getting a rooster for our girls. We have 8 amazing beautiful hens and we'd love give them a man and to let them be mamas! But, that means having a rooster, and my husband is deathly afraid of them and he loves chicken noodle soup! So I've come here before just heading out and grabbing the nearest rooster! We haven't had any predator problems or hen fights but we'd love to have a rooster just to ensure even more that those disastrous things (hopefully) won't happen!

So my dilemma is finding a gentle well behaved breed of rooster.I know it boils down to how much attention and affection you give them while they're young but I've also read some breeds are more susceptible to evil than others. We have 7 small grand-kids and would hate to ruin their backyard flock experience with a misbehaved rooster! All our girls are fairly large so a larger breed of rooster would be better, but we're open to all options!

Thank you in advance!
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dekel18042

Songster
Jul 18, 2013
2,195
300
241
Pennsylvania
First of all you can have a flock without a rooster, but if you want one there are several things to consider. What breeds are your hens? Do you want the same breed of rooster so you can raise purebred chicks. That's one thing to think of.
There are nice roosters, some are really sweet, and there are the nasty ones. I've found personally some of the nicest ones are ones that came up through the ranks so to speak, ones that were either hen raised to put into a mixed flock at an early age so they didn't stay or start at the top of the pecking order.
You can ask around. Many people who hatch their own chicks wind up with too many roosters. Sometimes they try to find homes for the better behaved roosters, the ones who show promise as flock guardians. This can get a nice rooster into your flock.
Hopefully someone who lives nearby can point you in the right direction. There are nice roosters out there. And sometimes I think the temperament is the individual rooster's, not the whole breed's.
 

barberfamducks

In the Brooder
5 Years
May 25, 2014
43
0
22
Colorado
First of all you can have a flock without a rooster, but if you want one there are several things to consider. What breeds are your hens? Do you want the same breed of rooster so you can raise purebred chicks. That's one thing to think of.
There are nice roosters, some are really sweet, and there are the nasty ones. I've found personally some of the nicest ones are ones that came up through the ranks so to speak, ones that were either hen raised to put into a mixed flock at an early age so they didn't stay or start at the top of the pecking order.
You can ask around. Many people who hatch their own chicks wind up with too many roosters. Sometimes they try to find homes for the better behaved roosters, the ones who show promise as flock guardians. This can get a nice rooster into your flock.
Hopefully someone who lives nearby can point you in the right direction. There are nice roosters out there. And sometimes I think the temperament is the individual rooster's, not the whole breed's.
We have a Buff Orpington, two Blue Laced Wyandottes, a Welsummer, two Ameraucanas, and two Silver Spangled Hamburgs. We don't necessarily care if they're the same breed as any of our hens.

Thank you! That sounds extremely reassuring as we'd raise him up around our bigger hens until he came of age! So that's perfect! Thank you again!
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Michael OShay

Crowing
5 Years
May 14, 2014
25,581
2,436
438
Montana
Unless you want fertilized eggs for hatching, I would recommend not getting a rooster as egg production is usually better by the hens when they are not stressed by having a rooster around. Plus you won't have to worry about neighbors being upset because your rooster crows in the middle of the night and you won't be feeding a non-productive mouth. However, if you do get a rooster I would recommend getting a rooster breed that has a well deserved reputation for being calm and gentle (potential lap pets) such as Australorps, Orpingtons, Brahmas, Cochins, Sussex, or Faverolles; and keep in mind that no matter how calm and gentle the reputation of any breed, there can always be an exception to the rule.
 

Lous Eggmoble

Chirping
6 Years
I have a rooster that I purchased. He was about a half year older than the hens.He tried to think he was the boss and decided to try me out. Well it didn't last long as he flew up a bit and when he landed a gave him a boot in the rear, just enough to show him who was still in charge. I also when I get the chance is to pick him up. This also shows him who is the boss. He has never went after anyone and we love him. As for crowing?? He does that all times of the day.
 

Michael OShay

Crowing
5 Years
May 14, 2014
25,581
2,436
438
Montana
I have a rooster that I purchased. He was about a half year older than the hens.He tried to think he was the boss and decided to try me out. Well it didn't last long as he flew up a bit and when he landed a gave him a boot in the rear, just enough to show him who was still in charge. I also when I get the chance is to pick him up. This also shows him who is the boss. He has never went after anyone and we love him. As for crowing?? He does that all times of the day.

Sometimes a showing of superior force works with a rooster and sometimes it doesn't. I've personally seen it both ways, and have read numerous accounts from BYC members who have seen it both ways. Some roosters respond with docility to a show of superior force by a human, and other roosters view it as being challanged and become even more aggressive. It all depends on the individual temperament of the rooster.
 

barberfamducks

In the Brooder
5 Years
May 25, 2014
43
0
22
Colorado
Unless you want fertilized eggs for hatching, I would recommend not getting a rooster as egg production is usually better by the hens when they are not stressed by having a rooster around. Plus you won't have to worry about neighbors being upset because your rooster crows in the middle of the night and you won't be feeding a non-productive mouth. However, if you do get a rooster I would recommend getting a rooster breed that has a well deserved reputation for being calm and gentle (potential lap pets) such as Australorps, Orpingtons, Brahmas, Cochins, Sussex, or Faverolles; and keep in mind that no matter how calm and gentle the reputation of any breed, there can always be an exception to the rule.
That is why we want a rooster. For fertile eggs as well as protection. Production matters, but not entirely. We live on a farm in the middle of nowhere so neighbors are nonexistent!
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Thank you, you've helped a lot!
Unless you want fertilized eggs for hatching, I would recommend not getting a rooster as egg production is usually better by the hens when they are not stressed by having a rooster around. Plus you won't have to worry about neighbors being upset because your rooster crows in the middle of the night and you won't be feeding a non-productive mouth. However, if you do get a rooster I would recommend getting a rooster breed that has a well deserved reputation for being calm and gentle (potential lap pets) such as Australorps, Orpingtons, Brahmas, Cochins, Sussex, or Faverolles; and keep in mind that no matter how calm and gentle the reputation of any breed, there can always be an exception to the rule.


I have a rooster that I purchased. He was about a half year older than the hens.He tried to think he was the boss and decided to try me out. Well it didn't last long as he flew up a bit and when he landed a gave him a boot in the rear, just enough to show him who was still in charge. I also when I get the chance is to pick him up. This also shows him who is the boss. He has never went after anyone and we love him. As for crowing?? He does that all times of the day.
I don't know if I could hit a rooster, but I'm sure if he hurt me I'd make an exception! My husband is afraid of them so it must hurt!
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I'm just afraid of raising a rooster (getting attached to him) and then end up having him be aggressive and have to find a home for him or be put in a pot.
 

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