Rooster questions

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by newbie32, Aug 21, 2013.

  1. newbie32

    newbie32 Songster

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    If I have a rooster in my small flock of 5, does it matter if there are other breeds? Which bird determines the breed born-the hen or the rooster? I have 4 Buff Orpingtons and 1 Polish. If the rooster is a Buff and mates with the polish what kind of chick will be born?

    Also, if I want eggs and maybe meat also, then will I need to have 2 different flocks? One with just hens for eggs and one with hens and a roo?

    I am so thankful for all responses and love that I can ask these questions on here. The internet never answers my questions precisely when I google a question.......thanks to all fellow backyarders-after I learn, I will pass on the knowledge you guys give me ;)
     
  2. Eggsoteric

    Eggsoteric Songster

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    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  3. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Free Ranging Premium Member

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    In answer to your first question, your chicks will be a mixed breed. Mixed breeds are just fine, if you're not planning on showing or breeding to sell specific breeds. You can have a rooster in with your laying flock. There is no difference in eating a fertilized egg or unfertilized egg. Just collect your eggs daily and there will be no problem. If you want both eggs and meat, a "dual-purpose" flock may be for you. Chickens that grow out to be heavier birds, yet are fairly good layers.
     
  4. newbie32

    newbie32 Songster

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    I know they are a dual breed, but will there be a problem with eggs that I want for eggs being fertilized? Will my broody hens get mad if I want them to hatch sometimes and give them to me for food sometime? Basically is it better to keep a rooster away from egg production and only with females when I want chicks or have two separate flocks?
     
  5. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Free Ranging Premium Member

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    I'm not exactly sure what your question is, but I'll try to answer what I think you're asking. Your hens will not be broody just because there is a rooster with them. Broodiness is ruled by hormones. When it hits, they will want to sit on whatever you put under them. They most likely will not all be broody at the saem time. Until that time, they will just lay their eggs and go on with their day. They won't care that you're taking their eggs and eating them. They won't even know the difference. If you get a broody hen (it's not always a guarantee that you'll have one - I went for a couple of years before I got one, then I had 5 this summer!), and you want some eggs hatched, put some under her. She will do the work. There are different ways of letting a hen brood - you can leave her with the flock, marking the eggs she's setting on to hatch so you can remove the extras that will be laid there. Or, you can separate her in her own little space and let her set in peace. Either way can work. In other words, you can leave your rooster and hens together. It will be fine.
     
  6. newbie32

    newbie32 Songster

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    Yes you answered my question, thank you :). Now I have another-will the eggs ever be half fertilized? I don't want to crack an egg and see any baby chick parts
     
  7. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Free Ranging Premium Member

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    I think you mean half developed... If you collect your eggs every day and refrigerate them (although I leave mine on the counter and they're just fine) you will not find a partially developed chick in your frying pan. [​IMG] If I find an egg in an odd spot, and I don't know how long been there, I toss it, but that's more to avoid a spoiled egg, not a developing one. The chicks do not start developing until a hen has been sitting on them for a day or more. They do not spontaneously develop just because they're fertilized. They need the right environment to grow, and that is provided by the hen. (Or an incubator, of course, but you would for sure know not to eat eggs out of there! [​IMG]) So just be diligent about egg collection and you shouldn't have a problem.
     
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  8. newbie32

    newbie32 Songster

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    That is exactly what I needed to know! I plan on collecting every day. Knowing me I will be like a child-all excited to see my treasures for at least a month lol[​IMG]
     

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