Rooster's comb bleeding all over the place-

Minky

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Nov 4, 2017
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I'm in Canada. Its winter, but its not even cold. Just been hovering around zero, or maybe a few below..so I'm not sure why my rooster has such bad frostbite. He got it about a moth ago (even then it was only maybe -10.) He is inside a large barn with his 25 hens, and he can go out into the totally covered run anytime (he can free range if he chooses but he chooses not to). He has an exceptionally large comb (a singlet) with 13 spikes on it. He also has very large waddles (is that what they are called?) The jiggly things under his chin- they are about the size of figs. Anyways, his comb spikes and waddles turned back about a month ago. There was some blood on the hanging cone feeder, I took a look at his comb and it didn't look too bad, so cleaned it and that was that.
Now I guess his wattle has started to rip apart (the black part from the unaffected part) and some of the hens are picking at it and making it bleed more. He seems unaffected by it all, and is doing his rooster thang. LOL He is leaving blood all over the feeder though, and it looks awful....but I am NOT catching him and putting on polysporin or vaseline. He is big and was hen raised and I have not held him since he was a chick. Is there anything to be done?
My other rooster (he is kept separate most times, in his own apartment, and he is outside free ranging with the goats and 1 Welsummer that loves him) has a medium sized floppy pea comb and I noticed blood on it too. I realize, a smaller comb is better for cold climates-- but you get what you get. (they were hatched here) and these guys are good, non- aggressive roosters, so they are keepers. How can I help them?
 

Wyorp Rock

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He has an exceptionally large comb (a singlet) with 13 spikes on it. He also has very large waddles (is that what they are called?) The jiggly things under his chin- they are about the size of figs. Anyways, his comb spikes and waddles turned back about a month ago.

Now I guess his wattle has started to rip apart (the black part from the unaffected part) and some of the hens are picking at it and making it bleed more.

I am NOT catching him and putting on polysporin or vaseline.

Is there anything to be done?
Can you post some photos?
Black tissue from frostbite is usually necrotic. It may fall off on it's own (self dub), but if it's bleeding and the hens are picking at it, then you need to take a closer look.
Frostbitten wattles and combs can get infected.

Wait until he is roosting at night, then swaddle him loosely in a towel, capturing his wings but make sure he can still breath easily. Give him a good going over, take photos, etc.
As for whether something needs to be put on the comb/wattles - that is hard to know - I'm sure that rubbing ointment would be painful. If you have a spray like Vetericyn, then that would be good.
If the hens are really picking at him, then you may need to separate him out until he heals. Large single comb and wattled bird do seem more prone to frostbite.

https://the-chicken-chick.com/frostbit-in-backyard-chickens-causes/
 

Compost King

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-10c is 14 degrees F, It rarely, almost never gets that cold here. When it does I have issues with frostbit combs. I am only posting what I have done to prevent frostbite to see if anyone says it's a bad idea. So its not so much me saying what is best to do... but I put vaseline on the combs before its that cold at night. I only do it with a few select roosters that are vulnerable to the cold. Before taking my advice wait for someone else to confirm its a good idea.

as far as treating it, the person who just posted ahead of me is giving advice i would take.
 

EggWalrus

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Aug 14, 2017
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You may have to finish dubbing his comb and wattles for him. If you have a bird that is prone to frostbite, it would seem to be the humane thing to do. It should also prevent further frostbite and possible infection. Just watch a video on how to dub and get some corn starch to stop any minor bleeding. He'll thank you in the long run! Good luck!
 

Wyorp Rock

🐓 ❤ 🐛
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Sep 20, 2015
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Southern N.C. Mountains
-10c is 14 degrees F, It rarely, almost never gets that cold here. When it does I have issues with frostbit combs. I am only posting what I have done to prevent frostbite to see if anyone says it's a bad idea. So its not so much me saying what is best to do... but I put vaseline on the combs before its that cold at night. I only do it with a few select roosters that are vulnerable to the cold. Before taking my advice wait for someone else to confirm its a good idea.

as far as treating it, the person who just posted ahead of me is giving advice i would take.
I have never tried vaseline, oil or wax based products on my rooster's comb/wattles before. One of mine had ever so slight frostbite on the edge of his wattles from drinking water a few years ago.
I have considered vaseline, but some people have said it may "lock in" moisture? Other say a wax based product works better:confused: Just don't know.
We've had temps in the low 20s already and so far no problems, but this guy I have really drags his wattles into the water dish, so I have considered putting something on them.
 

EggWalrus

Free Ranging
Aug 14, 2017
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Southeast Alabama
I have never tried vaseline, oil or wax based products on my rooster's comb/wattles before. One of mine had ever so slight frostbite on the edge of his wattles from drinking water a few years ago.
I have considered vaseline, but some people have said it may "lock in" moisture? Other say a wax based product works better:confused: Just don't know.
We've had temps in the low 20s already and so far no problems, but this guy I have really drags his wattles into the water dish, so I have considered putting something on them.
This might help both you and Old Big Wattles! It'll keep you from licking your lips too. :gig
 

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Saaniya

Crowing
Aug 31, 2017
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I'm in Canada. Its winter, but its not even cold. Just been hovering around zero, or maybe a few below..so I'm not sure why my rooster has such bad frostbite. He got it about a moth ago (even then it was only maybe -10.) He is inside a large barn with his 25 hens, and he can go out into the totally covered run anytime (he can free range if he chooses but he chooses not to). He has an exceptionally large comb (a singlet) with 13 spikes on it. He also has very large waddles (is that what they are called?) The jiggly things under his chin- they are about the size of figs. Anyways, his comb spikes and waddles turned back about a month ago. There was some blood on the hanging cone feeder, I took a look at his comb and it didn't look too bad, so cleaned it and that was that.
Now I guess his wattle has started to rip apart (the black part from the unaffected part) and some of the hens are picking at it and making it bleed more. He seems unaffected by it all, and is doing his rooster thang. LOL He is leaving blood all over the feeder though, and it looks awful....but I am NOT catching him and putting on polysporin or vaseline. He is big and was hen raised and I have not held him since he was a chick. Is there anything to be done?
My other rooster (he is kept separate most times, in his own apartment, and he is outside free ranging with the goats and 1 Welsummer that loves him) has a medium sized floppy pea comb and I noticed blood on it too. I realize, a smaller comb is better for cold climates-- but you get what you get. (they were hatched here) and these guys are good, non- aggressive roosters, so they are keepers. How can I help them?




Send his pics it will be helpful
 

Compost King

Free Ranging
Apr 19, 2018
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Salisbury, North Carolina
I have never tried vaseline, oil or wax based products on my rooster's comb/wattles before. One of mine had ever so slight frostbite on the edge of his wattles from drinking water a few years ago.
I have considered vaseline, but some people have said it may "lock in" moisture? Other say a wax based product works better:confused: Just don't know.
We've had temps in the low 20s already and so far no problems, but this guy I have really drags his wattles into the water dish, so I have considered putting something on them.
I had concerns with locking in moisture too, I wasn't certain if there was negative effects to locking in Moisture. Maybe just covering the tips where the frostbite is more likely is a good idea. Tomorrow we have a warm spell starting and I will be cleaning it off the roosters I used it on.
 

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